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I want to save a high ammount of datas in many Java classes/objects that I can do something like this:

public static void main(String[] args){
    System.out.println(String.valueOf(Data.Foo.bar));
    System.out.println(String.valueOf(Data.Foo.array[0].bar));
}

Output:

True
False

==== Data Class with all data:

public class Data {
    public class Base {
        public boolean bar = false;
        public Base[] array = {};
    }

    public class Foo extends Base {
        this.bar = true;
        this.array = {Abc};
    }
    public class Abc extends Base {}
}

I do NOT want to create instances of those classes but I want to access the datas inside the classes. The datas are all final and will not be changed but should be changed by another object which overrides those datas. (See class Foo in example)

What do I have to do to make this working?

edit: The Data class should be accessable from every point in the whole program. There should not be any instance of the Data class

edit Well, I will just make an example how this would work the "normal" way...

public class Data {
    public Foo foo = new Foo();
    public Abc abc = new Abc();

    public class Base {
        public boolean bar = false;
        public Base[] array = {};
    }

    public class Foo extends Base {
        this.bar = true;
        this.array = {abc}; //changed to abc from Abc
    }
    public class Abc extends Base {}
}

I want to refer to Foo class and Abc Class WITHOUT those two lines:

    public Foo foo = new Foo();
    public Abc abc = new Abc();
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Sep 11 '12 at 19:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Data is plural. Datum (or data point) is singular. Saying Datas is just confusing –  Edwin Buck Sep 10 '12 at 16:34
2  
Your question is quite confusing. Can you clarify where and how you're using this static data? –  David B Sep 10 '12 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Accessing data in classes is, in general, a violation of encapsulation or a lack of encapsulation in the first place. Neither one is a great idea if you are working with an object-oriented programming language.

Assuming that you do make some progress, type checking will just make things harder.

It looks very much like you are familiar with a different programming language, and asking how you do a common task in that programming language in Java. The answer is, you don't.

Rewrite you query like so

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(String.valueOf(Datas.getFoo().getBar()));
    System.out.println(String.valueOf(Datas.getFoo().getArray()[0].getBar()));
}

Or please consider fixing your logic to seem a little less about how you do things and a little more about what you are doing. Like so

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(String.valueOf(Door.isOpen()));
    System.out.println(String.valueOf(Building.getDoors().atIndex(0).isOpen()));
}

Finally, classes only exist conceptually, when the JVM is running, every thing is an instance of a class. The running JVM only deals with instances. If you want to avoid duplicating instances, that's fine; but, if you want to avoid dealing with instances, that's impossible. Attempting to do so will only result in trying to make the language act like a different language, which will give you bad results no matter how you look at it.

share|improve this answer
    
ok, then I'm going to create those variables :| –  user1494865 Sep 10 '12 at 17:10
    
They are not variables. They are objects, which is a way of mixing data and code in the same thing. This lets you hide the data behind a layer of code, which is a very useful thing because you can then change the data and the code within the object, without having to go back and rewrite your entire program to deal with the changes. The barrier is the interface of the object, and what goes on inside an object is none of the rest of the program's business (which is why they call it encapsulation). –  Edwin Buck Sep 10 '12 at 17:20

ehm i dont know if i understand good your question, but..

you dont want to make instances..you want to have 1 instance in whole program? Are you using threads or not?

i will advice you make the classes static.. Static reference is just one in whole program, you dont need create any other instances.

Another way without static fields and classes is calling the classes over references (references are "equal" to pointers in c/c++)..So you will create for example only 1 instance in main method and then calling some methods or whatever with reference on this instance..

Good way will be with using singleton object. Singleton is one of design patterns in object programming. There you have 100% guaranteed, that the object will be only one in whole program..Singleton is on base of static fields..So i dont think you dont need something so "hard" like singleton (but it will be good for you to know something about singleton), and better will be just use the static fields and static classes

share|improve this answer
    
Don't rely too heavily on singletons. They foster very bad programming practices. Better to have a single member enum and design for the possibility of multiple classes. Much easier to maintain and assure correct operation. –  Edwin Buck Sep 10 '12 at 17:02
    
thats true but singletons are about something else. If i learned it good, singletons are about that you got guaranteed only one instance in whole program (ok there are too multitons, but thats too something other)..with ENUM user will have same problem, have only one instance in program..if you want to have only one instance of this enum, you need to create it static. but i am agree with you, in the main purpose will be have just static enum.. –  piggy Sep 12 '12 at 1:49
    
Except that the singleton pattern isn't going to guarantee a single object without a lot of advanced programming that you probably haven't encountered yet. A single-valued enum is the safest way to create a singleton at this time. Singletons are part of a long progression of programming ideas, but they are rooted in the past. Much like we no longer use goto in programming, singletons often do more damage than they are worth. –  Edwin Buck Sep 12 '12 at 1:59
    
thats true, i cannot judge.. Maybe it is just next blunder what they learned me in school..they said all the time when we can use design patterns, use them.. i am agree with you because i dont like design patterns so much :]..but your simile to goto is absolutely correct –  piggy Sep 12 '12 at 17:48

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