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I have a .pm file in my current directory /t, and I inserted this line of code:

use lib qw(.);

Then I inserted this line of code

use TestUtil.pm;

where TestUtil.pm is in the current directory, but I keep getting this error:

Can't locate TestUtil.pm in @INC (@INC contains: . ........ ( Note that @INC contains the current directory)

TestUtil.pm:

package TestUtil;

use strict; use warnings;

BEGIN { use Exporter (); use vars qw( $VERSION @ISA @EXPORT );

# Set the version for version checking
$VERSION = 1.00; @ISA = qw( Exporter ); @EXPORT = qw(_a ); }

use vars qw( $VERSION @ISA @EXPORT );

sub _a { return 1; }

test_XXX.t:

use lib qw(.); use strict; use warnings;

use TestUtil;

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
Can you paste the headers (say, first 10 lines or so) of both Perl files? It will be a little easier to help troubleshoot if we can see it :) –  bedwyr Aug 5 '09 at 20:48
1  
Please edit the original posting to contain all relevant code (without errors), and delete your reply below. thanks! –  Ether Aug 5 '09 at 21:27
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4 Answers

If you are running your test like so:

prove --lib t

Then your working directory is actually a level above t/

So in your package

package t::TestUtil;
use strict; use warnings;

And in your test_XXX.t

use lib '.';
use t::TestUtil;

I've seen it done this way in several CPAN modules.

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1  
That's a good point: it would be helpful to know how the script is being invoked, and where the modules are located. –  bedwyr Aug 5 '09 at 21:18
1  
This worked! The fact that my working directory was a level above t/. Thanks snoopy, bedwyr and cberg! –  Kys Aug 5 '09 at 21:20
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Try removing the .pm from the module name in the "use ..." statement.

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Oh sorry I originally did not have the .pm in it. Also I tried require "./TestUtil.pm"; which did not work (and yes, this one has a .pm in it) –  Kys Aug 5 '09 at 20:44
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In TestUtil.pm


package TestUtil;

use strict; use warnings;

BEGIN { use Exporter (); use vars qw( $VERSION @ISA @EXPORT );

# Set the version for version checking
$VERSION = 1.00; @ISA = qw( Exporter ); @EXPORT = qw(_a ); }

use vars qw( $VERSION @ISA @EXPORT );

sub _a { return 1; }


In test_XXX.t


use lib qw(.); use strict; use warnings;

use TestUtil;


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2  
Just an etiquette-thing: it's best to post any updates to your question in the original source of the question. This way your responses don't get lost when other potential solutions are up-voted. –  bedwyr Aug 5 '09 at 21:09
    
Sorry. The character limit did not allow me to make it as a comment. –  Kys Aug 5 '09 at 21:13
    
See my original post -- one more quick idea. This worked for me when I copied your code. –  bedwyr Aug 5 '09 at 21:13
2  
@Kys, it's best to edit your original question. I like to use "EDIT" statements to show where my answer has been revised. –  bedwyr Aug 5 '09 at 21:14
1  
I added the code to the question. –  Brad Gilbert Aug 5 '09 at 22:16
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Have you declared the TestUtil.pm as a TestUtil module?

# in your TestUtil module...
package TestUtil;

EDIT:

Is your Perl module (TestUtil.pm) returning a status? Try adding this to the end of the TestUtil.pm file:

1;
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So I have: # in my TestUtil.pm file... package TestUtil; use strict; use warnings; sub a{ } # in my test_XXX.t file... use lib qw(.); use TestUtil; –  Kys Aug 5 '09 at 20:57
1  
Can you paste the code in your original question? It's hard to think of potential solutions w/out more information. –  bedwyr Aug 5 '09 at 21:01
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