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Below is a simple homework problem I have for an intro CS class:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main() {
using namespace std;
int num1; int num2; int num3; int ans; 
char oper;
/* 
cout << "Enter an arithmetic expression:" << endl;
cin >> oper >> num1 >> num2 >> num3;
DEBUGGING
*/

cout << "enter an operator" << endl;
cin >> oper; /* Segmentation error occurs here... */
cout << "enter number 1" << endl;
cin >> num1; 
cout << "enter number 2" << endl;
cin >> num2;
cout << "enter number 3" << endl;
cin >> num3;
cout << "okay" << endl;

if (oper = "+") {
    if (num1 + num2 != num3) {
        cout << "These numbers don't add up!" << endl;
    }
    else {
        ans = num1 + num2;
        cout << num1 << "+" << num2 << "==" << ans << endl;
    }
}
else if (oper = "-") {}
else if (oper = "*") {}
else if (oper = "/") {}
else if (oper = "%") {}
else {
    cout << "You're an idiot. This operator clearly does not exist... Try again " << endl;
}

return 0;
}

I'm not really familiar with Segmentation Faults so if someone could explain if I'm doing something wrong it'd be awesome.

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closed as too localized by Robert Harvey Sep 10 '12 at 18:10

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5  
What do you type for the input? –  chris Sep 10 '12 at 16:47
4  
3  
Compile your program with debugging information and warnings enabled (e.g. g++ -Wall -g on Linux), then learn to use a debugger (e.g. gdb on Linux). –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 10 '12 at 16:47
3  
Can you post a complete, compilable example that demonstrates the error and tell us exactly what input you gave it when you got an error. –  David Schwartz Sep 10 '12 at 16:49
1  
@BrianCollette, Ohh, you're comparing a single character with a string literal. That's bad. You should use single quotation marks for characters: 'c'. –  chris Sep 10 '12 at 17:03

4 Answers 4

Your code does not compile with gcc 4.1.2. What compiler are you using? Also, "if (oper = '+')" looks incorrect to me. Do you want to assign '+' to variable oper there?

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I could not find error in the code. VC++.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
int main() {
    using namespace std;
    int num1; int num2; int num3=0; int ans; 
    char oper;



    cout << "Enter an arithmetic expression: ( [/ 4 2]  or [+ 1 1] or [- 5 4] )" << endl;
    cin >> oper >> num1 >> num2;

    switch (oper)
    {
        case '+':
                ans=num1+num2 ;
            break;

        case '-':
                ans=num1-num2 ;
            break;

        case '*':
                ans=num1*num2 ;
            break;

        case '/':
                ans=num1/num2 ;
            break;



    }

    cout << "\nans= " << ans<<"\n\n";


    return 0;

}
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2  
The OP's problems are clearly discussed in the comments, simply posting completely different working code is not an answer. –  Mooing Duck Sep 10 '12 at 17:16

Change the following :

if (oper == '+')

else if (oper == '-') {}
else if (oper == '*') {}
else if (oper == '/') {}
else if (oper == '%') {}

Use ' ' for characters and == for boolean logic !

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This was a bug in his code but cannot cause a segfault on the line indicated. –  AAA Sep 10 '12 at 20:53

cin will try to put more than one character in oper, you'll need a vector of char to hold all the characters that cin will put in it (including the newline character)

In this case you can use char oper[10] that will be able to handle the one character input that you are trying.

I would however advise towards using std::getline(); ( http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/string/getline/ )

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1  
cin >> oper; will extract one character, no more, as oper is a char. Here's a sample. –  chris Sep 10 '12 at 16:56

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