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Let's say I have a factor variable with numerous levels and I am trying to group them into several groups.

> levels(dat$years_continuously_insured_order2)
 [1] "1"    "2"    "3"    "4"    "5"    "6"    "7"    "8"    "9"    "10"   "11"   "12"   "13"   "14"   "15"   "16"   "17"   "18"  
[19] "19"   "20" 

> levels(dat$age_of_oldest_driver)
 [1] "-16" "1"   "15"  "16"  "17"  "18"  "19"  "20"  "21"  "22"  "23"  "24"  "25"  "26"  "27"  "28"  "29"  "30"  "31"  "32"  "33" 
[22] "34"  "35"  "36"  "37"  "38"  "39"  "40

I have a script which runs through these variables and groups them into several categories. However, the number of levels could (and usually is) different each time my script runs. Therefore, if my original code to group the variables was the following (see below), it wouldn't be of use if in an hour later, my script runs and the levels are different. Instead of 15 levels, I could now have 25 levels and the values are different, but I still need to group them into specific categories.

dat$years_continuously_insured2 <- NA
dat$years_continuously_insured2[dat$years_continuously_insured %in% levels(dat$years_continuously_insured)[1]] <- NA
dat$years_continuously_insured2[dat$years_continuously_insured %in% levels(dat$years_continuously_insured)[2:3]] <- "1 or less"
dat$years_continuously_insured2[dat$years_continuously_insured %in% levels(dat$years_continuously_insured)[4]] <- "2"
dat$years_continuously_insured2[dat$years_continuously_insured %in% levels(dat$years_continuously_insured)[5:7]] <- "3 +"
dat$years_continuously_insured2 <- factor(dat$years_continuously_insured2)

How can I find a more elegant way to group variables into segments? Are there better ways to do this in R?

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could convert your factor levels in the continuously insured variable to numeric and then cut to your categories and re-factor(). The first step is described in the R-FAQ (to do properly it's a two step process):

 dat$years_cont <-  factor( cut(  as.numeric(as.character( 
                                     dat$years_continuously_insured_order2)),
                                 breaks=c(0,2,3, Inf), right=FALSE  ),
                           labels=c( "1 or less", "2", "3 +")
                           )
#-----------------
> str(dat)
'data.frame':   100 obs. of  2 variables:
 $ years_continuously_insured_order2: Factor w/ 20 levels "1","10","11",..: 4 15 19 5 8 4 16 12 12 18 ...
 $ years_cont                       : Factor w/ 3 levels "1 or less","2",..: 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 ...
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If your original column is a number, treat it as a number, not a factor. A much easier way to do what you're doing is:

bin.value = function(x) {
    ifelse(x <= 1, "1 or less", ifelse(x == 2, "2", "3+"))
}

dat$years_continuously_insured2 = as.factor(bin.value(as.integer(dat$years_continuously_insured)))
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Hey, whatever floats your boat. Upon reconsideration I've changed the solution to use ifelse. Mostly what worries me about ifelse is if you have to add additional conditions, it gets more and more nested and intimidating (especially to beginners). –  David Robinson Sep 10 '12 at 20:33
    
I've deleted my comments. I think the current version will lead the newbies on the path of R-ighteouness. –  BondedDust Sep 10 '12 at 20:41

Select the levels a priori. Since "years_continuously_insured" will presumably turn out to be an integer, use something like seq(1,100,1)

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2  
He needs to convert pre-existing data to a new grouping. –  BondedDust Sep 10 '12 at 17:35
    
That isn't what he is asking. He already seems to have some handle on defining a new data frame column, and I didn't want to presume he was aiming for a more modular approach. –  Taylor Sep 10 '12 at 17:42

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