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I have a question about throw-expressions and copy constructors.

#include <iostream>

class Foo
{
public:
   Foo() { std::cout << "Foo::Foo() \n"; }
   Foo(const Foo&) { std::cout << "Foo::Foo(const Foo&) \n"; }
   ~Foo() { std::cout << "Foo::~Foo() \n"; }  
};

int main()
{
   try
   {
      throw Foo(); 
   }
   catch (...)
   {
      std::cerr << "Error \n"; 
   }     
}

In C++98 / C++03, does this code print:

Foo::Foo()
Error
Foo::Foo(const Foo&)
Foo::~Foo()

and in C++11 one of the following:

Foo::Foo()
Error
Foo::Foo(const Foo&)
Foo::~Foo()

or

Foo::Foo()    
Error
Foo::~Foo()

I saw this only in C++11:

12.8 Copying and moving class objects [class.copy]

31 ... — in a throw-expression, when the operand is the name of a non-volatile automatic object (other than a function or catch-clause parameter) whose scope does not extend beyond the end of the innermost enclosing try-block (if there is one), the copy/move operation from the operand to the exception object (15.1) can be omitted by constructing the automatic object directly into the exception object

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1  
I think none of those are right, except for the last one. The word Error would always happen after all constructors. I don't know if that's a typo on your part, or part of the answer? What exactly are you asking? – Mooing Duck Sep 10 '12 at 17:11
1  
Also, you might want to put all of your output to the same stream, just to be sure that's not the cause of the ordering you're having an issue with. – Dave S Sep 10 '12 at 17:20
    
Maybe some poor compilers do copy exception object on catch (...) in case of throw; within? – PiotrNycz Sep 10 '12 at 19:00

The copying (or moving in C++11) of an exception object is not defined, but it must be copyable (or movable in C++11) and the implementation may copy (or move) it as many times as they like for funsies.

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1  
or fewer times than you expect. – Loki Astari Sep 10 '12 at 18:13

I would expect to see:

Foo::Foo()             // construction
Foo::Foo(const Foo&)   // copy to special throw location
Error                  // catch and print error
Foo::~Foo()            // at the end of the catch block the exception object is destroyed.

or

Foo::Foo()             // As above but compiler has optimized the copy out.
Error
Foo::~Foo()

This is because:

throw Foo();   // Creates a local temporary object.
               // The throw then copies (moves) the local temporary to an implementation 
               // specific location to preserve it while the stack is unwound.

But note: The compiler is allowed to elide copy of objects (even if they have side affects). So in this situation the compiler can optimize the code to construct it explicitly in the implementation specific location.

Also worth noting:

catch (Foo e)         // Copies the exception object from the implementation specific location
                      // to e so it can be used in the try block. Note this may also result in
                      // object slicing if you don;t catch the exact type.

 catch (Foo const& e) // No copy required as you are using a reference
                      // Thus no chance of slicing.
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