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How to check if a binary number can be divided by 10 (10 in decimal; without converting it to other system ofc. :))?
For example, we have number:
1010 1011 0100 0001 0000 0100
How we can check that this number is divisible by 10?
Thanks in advance.

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4  
Do you mean 10 decimal or 10 binary? –  Eric J. Sep 10 '12 at 17:14
    
Every number (exuding 0) is divisible by 10 –  asawyer Sep 10 '12 at 17:15
    
10 decimal. I forgot to mention it in the post. Edit: post edited. –  Patryk Wychowaniec Sep 10 '12 at 17:16
1  
@EricJ. What I was trying to get at was that the question was ambiguously worded. –  asawyer Sep 10 '12 at 17:22
3  
@asawyer actually, the strict mathmatical definition of x being divisable by y means there exists some integer m such that ym = x that is it is divided without remainder -- so it was not at all ambiguous. I can understand how it can be confusing since we perform division on non-divisable numbers all the time, i.e. we get a result with a remiander/ a decimal -- which make no sense if you are careful with the definition of the word divisable. –  gbtimmon Sep 10 '12 at 17:28

2 Answers 2

First split the number into odd and even bits (I'm calling "even" the bits corresponding to even powers of 2):

100100110010110000000101101110 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 even 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 odd

Now in each of these, add and subtract the digits alternately, as in the standard test for divisibility by 11 in decimal (starting with addition at the right):

100100110010110000000101101110 +0-1+0-1+0-0+1-0+0-0+1-1+0-1+0 = -2 +1-0+0-1+0-1+1-0+0-0+0-0+1-1+1 = 1

Now double the sum of the odd digits and add it to the sum of the even digits:

2*1 + -2 = 0

If the result is divisible by 5, as in this case, the number itself is divisible by 5.

Since this number is also divisible by 2 (the rightmost digit being 0), it is divisible by 10.

http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/55908.html

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I found this; I thought that somebody has found an easier solution, that's why I created this question. Anyway, thanks ;) –  Patryk Wychowaniec Sep 10 '12 at 17:23

If you are talking about computational methods, you can do a divisiblity-by-5 test and a divisibility-by-2 test.
The numbers below assume unsigned 32-bit arithmetic, but can easily be extended to larger numbers.

I'll provide some code first, followed by a more textual explanation:

unsigned int div5exact(unsigned int n)
{
    // returns n/5 as long as n actually divides 5
    // (because 'n * (INV5 * 5)' == 'n * 1' mod 2^32

    #define INV5 0xcccccccd

    return n * INV5;

}

unsigned int divides5(unsigned int n)
{
    unsigned int q = div5exact(n);
    if (q <= 0x33333333) /* q*5 < 2^32? */
    {
        /* q*5 doesn't overflow, so n == q*5 */
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        /* q*5 overflows, so n != q*5 */
        return 0;
    }
}

int divides2(unsigned int n)
{
    /* easy divisibility by 2 test */
    return (n & 1) == 0;
}

int divides10(unsigned int n)
{
    return divides2(n) && divides5(n);
}


/* fast one-liner: */
#define DIVIDES10(n) ( ((n) & 1) == 0 && ((n) * 0xcccccccd) <= 0x33333333 )

Divisibility by 2 is easy: (n&1) == 0 means that n is even.

Divisibility by 5 involves multiplying by the inverse of 5, which is 0xcccccccd (because 0xcccccccd * 5 == 0x400000001, which is just 0x1 if you truncate to 32 bits).
When you multiply n*5 by the inverse of 5, you get n * 5*(inverse of 5), which in 32-bit math simplifies to n*1 .

Now let's say n and q are 32-bit numbers, and q = n*(inverse of 5) mod 232.
Because n is no greater than 0xffffffff, we know that n/5 is no greater than (232-1)/5 (which is 0x33333333). Therefore, we know if q is less than or equal to (232-1)/5, then we know n divides exactly by 5, because q * 5 doesn't get truncated in 32 bits, and is therefore equal to n, so n divides q and 5.

If q is greater than (232-1)/5, then we know it doesn't divide 5, because there is a one-one mapping between the 32-bit numbers divisible by 5 and the numbers between 0 and (232-1)/5, and so any number out of this range doesn't map to a number that's divisible by 5.

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