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I ran into this code, foreach($vars as $a=>$var){ // some process here} and I wonder what is the difference when using foreach($vars as $var){ // some process here} ? Thanks.

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closed as not constructive by andrewsi, iMat, mario, Ashish Gupta, j0k Sep 11 '12 at 6:21

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10  
C'mon. php.net/foreach –  ceejayoz Sep 10 '12 at 17:17
1  
Agreed with @ceejayoz . Php Documentation is relatively easy to understand. –  williamcarswell Sep 10 '12 at 17:21
    
Thanks guys. :) –  Tsukimoto Mitsumasa Sep 10 '12 at 18:09
    
aw. Really? Is that necessary? –  Tsukimoto Mitsumasa Sep 11 '12 at 14:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The operator => represents the relationship between a key and value. You can imagine that the key points => to the value.

EDIT:

foreach can be used in two ways:

1.Iterating over values:

Each time round the loop, the variable is set to the next value in the array.

Eg:

$fruitColours = array(
    "Banana" => "Yellow",
    "Apple"  => "Green",
    "Plum"   => "Purple",
);

foreach ($fruitColours as $colour)
{
    echo "$colour<br/>\n";
}

?>

The above will display:

Yellow
Green
Purple

Only the values of the array are displayed.

2.Iterating over keys and values

Each time round the loop, the variables are set to the next key and value pair.

Eg:

$fruitColours = array(
    "Banana" => "Yellow",
    "Apple"  => "Green",
    "Plum"   => "Purple",
);

foreach ($fruitColours as $fruit => $colour)
{
    echo "$fruit is $colour<br/>\n";
}

?>

The above will display:

Banana is Yellow
Apple is Green
Plum is Purple

Check the php foreach documentation for further reference

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$vars = array(
  'key1'=>'something',
  'key2'=>'test',
);

foreach($vars as $key=>$value){
  echo "$key:$value" . PHP_EOL;
}

will output:

key1:something
key2:test
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foreach($vars as $a=>$var){ // some process here} iterates through an array ($vars in this case). In each iteration, $a is attributed the key of the actual array item, and $var the respective value.

foreach($vars as $var){ // some process here} does the same as above, but with this one, only the value of each array item is returned. The key value is not returned.

Check this article in the php manual for more information.

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The difference is that with foreach($vars as $var){ // some process here} you only get the value, while with foreach($vars as $a=>$var){ // some process here} you also get its key.

    $data = array('NAME' => 'Tom', 'AGE' => 20);

foreach($data as $var){
    echo $var . "\n";
}
echo "\n";
foreach($data as $key => $var){
        echo $key .': '. $var . "\n";
}

will output

Tom
20

NAME: Tom
AGE: 20
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