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I am using Visual Studio c++ and want to convert the Cstring to Byte. I have written this code but it gave me error in the second line that "data" is undefined.

    CString data = _T( "OK");
    LPBYTE pByte = new BYTE[data.GetLength() + 1];
    memcpy(pByte, (VOID*)LPCTSTR(data), data.GetLength());

Further more I need to convert LPBYTE to const char for strcmp function. I have written the code but I can't find the issue with it.

      const LPBYTE lpBuffer;
      LPBYTE lpData = lpBuffer;
      CString rcvValue(LPCSTR(lpBuffer));
  const CHAR* cstr = (LPCSTR)rcvValue;
      if (strcmp (cstr,("ABC")) == 0)
      { //// }
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2  
That code is correct (assuming you account for the trailing 0 afterwards. Please paste the real error you're getting. –  Drew Dormann Sep 10 '12 at 17:44
1  
This code is not correct at all. It works if the base type for CString is 'char', but if Unicode is enabled, and the base type is wchar_t this is broken. GetLength returns the number of characters (that is the number of char's or wchar_t's), not the number of bytes allocated to hold the string. –  Nathanael Sep 10 '12 at 18:13

4 Answers 4

Make sure you include atlstr.h to provide the definition of CString, as below:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <Windows.h>
#include <atlstr.h>

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    CString data = _T( "OK");
    LPBYTE pByte = new BYTE[data.GetLength() + 1];
    memcpy(pByte, (VOID*)LPCTSTR(data), data.GetLength());
    return 0;
}
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i didnt downvote your comment dude. but u downvoted me - lol –  Nabeel Sep 10 '12 at 17:59
    
not me! I think someone else downvoted both of us, at least temporarily. –  Jay Sep 10 '12 at 18:04

I'm fairly certain Jay is correct for your first question. You need to include the right header.

For your second question, why would you expect that code to work? Let's walk through what the code you've written actually does.

  1. Create a char pointer (char *) without initializing it. This leaves lpData/lpBuffer pointing to a random location in memory.
  2. Create a CString and initialize it with this random pointer.
  3. Extract the buffer from the CString and compare it to a string literal.

Keeping in mind that the CString contains random garbage, what exactly do you expect this code to do? (Other than crash horribly? =) )

I also want to point out that you need to be more consistent in your approach to strings. Do you plan to support both char and wchar_t based strings as your use of TCHAR in the first sections suggests? Do you want to work with C-Style strings or do you want to use objects like CString? If you want to work with CString's, just use the Compare function that CString provides. Don't bother with strcmp.

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Probably you didn't include the cruicial header

    #include <afx.h>

    int main()
    {                   
        CString data = _T( "OK");
        LPBYTE pByte = new BYTE[data.GetLength() + 1];
        memcpy(pByte, (VOID*)LPCTSTR(data), data.GetLength());

        return 0;
    }

This code works fine.

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This is to convert string like "0xFF", "0x1F" to byte

BYTE String2Byte(char &cHighNibble, char &cLowNibble)
{
    BYTE bData = 0;
    if((cHighNibble >= 48) & (cHighNibble <= 57))
    {
        if((cLowNibble >= 48) & (cLowNibble <= 57))
            bData = (cHighNibble - 48)*16 + (cLowNibble - 48);
        else
            bData = (cHighNibble - 48)*16 + (cLowNibble + 10 - 65);
    }
    else
    {
        if((cLowNibble >= 48) & (cLowNibble <= 57))
            bData = (cHighNibble + 10 - 65)*16 + (cHighNibble - 48);
        else
            bData = (cHighNibble + 10 - 65)*16 + (cHighNibble + 10 - 65);
    }
    return bData;
}
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