Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a UIColor that I want to use across every view controller to tint it's title/navigation bar. I was wondering what is the best way to declare such a property. Should I declare it as a member of the application delegate? Create a model class for global properties, and declare a static function + (UIColor)getTitleColor? Pass the UIColor object to every view controller? Is there another method that I did not describe, that is viewed as being the best way to go about this?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are lots of ways to do this. I like to do it by putting a category on UIColor:

UIColor+MyAppColors.h

@interface UIColor (MyAppColors)

+ (UIColor *)MyApp_titleBarBackgroundColor;

@end

UIColor+MyAppColors.m

#import "UIColor+MyAppColors.h"

@implementation UIColor (MyAppColors)

+ (UIColor *)MyApp_titleBarBackgroundColor {
    static UIColor *color;
    static dispatch_once_t once;
    dispatch_once(&once, ^{
        color = [UIColor colorWithHue:0.2 saturation:0.6 brightness:0.7 alpha:1];
    });
    return color;
}

@end

Then I can use it by importing UIColor+MyAppColors.h in any file that needs the title bar background color, and calling it like this:

myBar.tintColor = [UIColor MyApp_titleBarBackgroundColor];
share|improve this answer
add comment

By what you are trying to do, I think you could do it much easier by using appearance. You can assign different colors to all of your different types of interface elements. Check the UIAppearance protocol for more information.

If this is not what you want, then I would suggest @rob mayoff answer: using a category.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.