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Here is my code:

 function sort(stack){
  if(stack.length > 0){
   var x = stack.pop();
   sort(stack);
   insert(x,stack);
  }
}
function insert(x,stack){
  if(stack.length>0){
    var tops = topr(stack);
    if(tops>x){
      stack.pop();
      insert(x,stack);
      stack.push(tops);
    }else{
      stack.push(x);
    }
  }
}

function topr(stack){
 var t = stack.pop();
  stack.push(t);
  return t;
}
var stack = [1,3,2];
sort(stack);
console.log(stack);

I had to build this without using an array (recursion). But it returns void/aka nothing in the console.

Edit: Full working solution:

function sort(stack) {
    if(stack.length > 0) {
        var x = stack.pop();
        sort(stack);
        insert(x,stack);
    }
    return stack;
}

function insert(x,stack){
  if(stack.length>0){
    var tops = topr(stack);
    if(tops>x){
      stack.pop();
      insert(x,stack);
      stack.push(tops);
    }else{
      stack.push(x);
    }
  }else{
   stack.push(x);
  }
}

function topr(stack){
 var t = stack.pop();
  stack.push(t);
  return t;
}
var stack = [1,3,2];
stack = sort(stack);
console.log(stack);
share|improve this question
    
WTF are you sorting a stack for? The only difference between a stack and an array in JS is the LIFOness. You toss that out, you might as well just be using an array. –  cHao Sep 10 '12 at 18:24
    
@cHao, I am doing this not for production, but for my understanding of stacks. –  funerr Sep 10 '12 at 18:25
1  
Then understand this: Stacks do not need, and should not even have, a sort function. It blows the stackiness of stacks all to hell. The only thing they should be able to do is push, pop, and possibly peek at the top element. Oh, and maybe get a count of how many elements are in it. –  cHao Sep 10 '12 at 18:26
    
@cHao Exactly. ) Wanted to update my answer with that, but I guess your comment stands quite nice here. While there's such a thing as priority queue, 'priority stack' just doesn't make sense. –  raina77ow Sep 10 '12 at 18:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because it doesn't have return stack in its end, perhaps? Without explicit return statement function will return undefined when it completes.

No, it was only the icing on the cake. In fact, there are several logical errors in this code:

  • insert() function doesn't insert a value (x) to an empty stack
  • topr() function is confusing. For a non-empty stack, it returns its last element (which can be done more efficiently with just return stack[stack.length - 1], I guess. But if stack is empty, it pushes undefined to it (as it's a result of pop empty array).
share|improve this answer
    
What about now? –  funerr Sep 10 '12 at 18:11
    
A sorted stack. –  funerr Sep 10 '12 at 18:12
    
The topr function is alright, because it is called inside the length if. but the solution was the: "else{ stack.push(x); }" Thanks! –  funerr Sep 10 '12 at 18:25

As already mentioned by raina77ow, you are not returning anything from your sort method. Then with your new update you are only updating the local version of stack; therefore, if you return stack from your sort method, you should receive the expected results.

function sort(stack) {
    if(stack.length > 0) {
        var x = stack.pop();
        stack = sort(stack);
        insert(x,stack);
    }

    return stack;
}

var stack = [1,3,2];
stack = sort(stack);
console.log(stack);
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, not working. (still returns a blank value) –  funerr Sep 10 '12 at 18:16
    
I updated my answer. I did not notice that you called sort again within the sort method. You are most likely going to have to return values from your other functions as well. I am going to keep looking into this. –  Josh Mein Sep 10 '12 at 18:18
    
Thanks Josh!, I suspect JavaScript may not suit this kind of recursive operations (maybe the pointers are deleted by some kind of garbage collector of something). –  funerr Sep 10 '12 at 18:23
    
No I am pretty sure javascript can handle this just fine. Your understanding of it seems to be a little faulty. –  Josh Mein Sep 10 '12 at 18:24
    
@raina77ow found the bug. –  funerr Sep 10 '12 at 18:26

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