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The c# app that I'm working on uses an ObservableDictionary. The performance on this is not nearly fast enough to accommodate it's functionality. The ObservableDictionary is very rapidly being interacted with (Removing, Adding, and Updating elements) and has to sort every single time a change is made. Is there an alternative I can use to ObservableDictionary that would focus on performance and still be able to sort rapidly?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's very simple to write your own that does not cause a rebinding each time an add / update or delete is done. We wrote our own because of this very reason. Essentially what we do is to disable the notification that a change has been made until all objects in the collection have been processed, and then we generate the notification. It looks something like this. As you can see, we use MvvmLight as our MVVM framework library. This will improve performance tremendously.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Collections.Specialized;
using System.Linq;
using FS.Mes.Client.Mvvm.MvvmTools.MvvmLight;

namespace FS.Mes.Client.Mvvm.MvvmTools
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Our implementation of ObservableCollection. This fixes one significant limitation in the .NET Framework implementation. When items
    /// are added or removed from an observable collection, the OnCollectionChanged event is fired for each item. Depending on how the collection
    /// is bound, this can cause significant performance issues. This implementation gets around this by suppressing the notification until all
    /// items are added or removed. This implementation is also thread safe. Operations against this collection are always done on the thread that
    /// owns the collection.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Collection type</typeparam>
    public class FsObservableCollection<T> : ObservableCollection<T>
    {
        #region [Constructor]
        /// <summary>
        /// Constructor
        /// </summary>
        public FsObservableCollection()
        {
            DispatcherHelper.Initialize();
        }
        #endregion

        #region [Public Properties]
        /// <summary>
        /// Gets or sets a property that determines if we are delaying notifications on updates.
        /// </summary>
        public bool DelayOnCollectionChangedNotification { get; set; }
        #endregion

        /// <summary>
        /// Add a range of IEnumerable items to the observable collection and optionally delay notification until the operation is complete.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="items"></param>
        /// <param name="delayCollectionChangedNotification">Value indicating whether delay notification will be turned on/off</param>
        public void AddRange(IEnumerable<T> items, bool delayCollectionChangedNotification = true)
        {
            if (items == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("items");

            DoDispatchedAction(() =>
            {
                DelayOnCollectionChangedNotification = delayCollectionChangedNotification;

                // Do we have any items to add?
                if (items.Any())
                {
                    try
                    {
                        foreach (var item in items)
                            this.Add(item);
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        // We're done. Turn delay notification off and call the OnCollectionChanged() method and tell it we had a 'dramatic' change
                        // in the collection.
                        DelayOnCollectionChangedNotification = false;
                        this.OnCollectionChanged(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset));
                    }
                }
            });
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Clear the items in the ObservableCollection and optionally delay notification until the operation is complete.
        /// </summary>
        public void ClearItems(bool delayCollectionChangedNotification = true)
        {
            // Do we have anything to remove?
            if (!this.Any())
                return;

            DoDispatchedAction(() =>
            {
                try
                {
                    DelayOnCollectionChangedNotification = delayCollectionChangedNotification;

                    this.Clear();
                }
                finally
                {
                    // We're done. Turn delay notification off and call the OnCollectionChanged() method and tell it we had a 'dramatic' change
                    // in the collection.
                    DelayOnCollectionChangedNotification = false;
                    this.OnCollectionChanged(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset));
                }
            });
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Override the virtual OnCollectionChanged() method on the ObservableCollection class.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="e">Event arguments</param>
        protected override void OnCollectionChanged(NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            DoDispatchedAction(() =>
            {
                if (!DelayOnCollectionChangedNotification)
                    base.OnCollectionChanged(e);
            });
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Makes sure 'action' is executed on the thread that owns the object. Otherwise, things will go boom.
        /// </summary>
        ///<param name="action">The action which should be executed</param>
        private static void DoDispatchedAction(Action action)
        {
            DispatcherHelper.CheckInvokeOnUI(action);
        }
    }
}
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I don't think that would be possible in the scope of the project that I'm working on, albeit a very good idea. I'll keep it in mind for last resort, and for future reference. Thanks! –  Jason Higgins Sep 10 '12 at 18:33

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