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I'm trying to write to a file, with the first line being [0] in the list, 2nd line being [1], etc.

Here's a quick example

crimefile = open('C:\states.csv', 'r')
b = crimefile.read()
l = b.splitlines()
print l[1]

states = open('c:\states.txt', 'w')
states.write('"abc"' + " " + '%s' '\n' %l[0+=])

states.close()

I'm really new to loops in Python and I am not too sure about loops and how to increase integers during loops, basically.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

use enumerate():

for ind,line in enumerate(l):
    print ind,line

example:

In [55]: lis=['a','b','c','d','e','f']
In [57]: for i,x in enumerate(lis):
    print i,x
   ....:     
   ....:     
0 a
1 b
2 c
3 d
4 e
5 f

or using len() and xrange():

In [59]: for i in xrange(len(lis)):     #use range() in case of python 3.x
   ....:     print i,lis[i]
   ....:     
   ....:     
0 a
1 b
2 c
3 d
4 e
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3  
Of course, this and many other use cases don't actually need enumerate -- you can just use for line in l: .... –  delnan Sep 10 '12 at 18:27
    
Ooh ok over my head... I'm not gonna ask anymore questions though, just going to dissect that. Thanks brother. –  Adam Magyar Sep 10 '12 at 18:38

This is the 'pythonic' solution:

l = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
with open('outfile', 'w') as f:
    f.write('\n'.join(l))

I am not sure about your 'abc' stuff, but considering you need that, this would be a solution:

'\n'.join(['"abc" %s' % e for e in l])
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One often-overlooked issue when using '\n'.join is that you don't get the \n character at the end, on the last line. Once or twice that's broken a processing tool which wasn't as robust as it should have been. –  DSM Sep 27 '12 at 15:05

I'm not really sure I got your question, but this is how i would solve it anyhow:

f = open('C:\states.csv', 'r')
states = open('c:\states.txt', 'w')

for line in f:
    states.write('"abc"  %s\n' % line)

f.close()
states.close()
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1  
you could improve this solution by using the with open(<filename>) as file context manager syntax, then you wouldn't have to worry about explicitly close the file –  Ctrlspc Sep 10 '12 at 18:41
    
i thinkkk you solved it a bit more eloquently, so thanks :) quick question, why the %(seemingly instead of a single quote) before the newline after the string in the argument on line 5? –  Adam Magyar Sep 10 '12 at 18:53
    
Oh I'm sorry that was a typo, I've fixed that. Also since your string seems to be -"abc" [thevalue]\n- I see no point in separating the string into smaller pieces. –  Daniel Figueroa Sep 11 '12 at 10:04

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