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If I start with a contiguous sequence of dates:

(Date.today..(Date.today + 30)).to_a

How can I sort this array so that all dates, in sequence, are at least 1 day apart?

I realise that this would of course not be possible for an array of 2 contiguous dates.

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1  
This is called a partial order. There will be several linear extensions that are valid, so something like a comparison sort (which requires a total order) will not be applicable. Have you looked into topological sorting? – oldrinb Sep 10 '12 at 18:31
    
always length even? – tokland Sep 10 '12 at 19:40

This works for me:

dates = (Date.today..(Date.today + 30)).to_a
dates.each_with_index{|d,i| dates.push(dates.delete(d)) if i % 2}
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1  
I believe this is the same as the answer I was going to suggest, in plain English: remove all dates with an even index and place them at the end. So, for example, {1,2,3,4,5,6} becomes {1,3,5,2,4,6}. – Stephen Garle Sep 10 '12 at 18:46

Has the array always an even length? is so, I'd simply write (easily modifiable for odd length if required):

>> (1..6).each_slice(2).to_a.transpose.flatten(1)
=> [1, 3, 5, 2, 4, 6]
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(1..6).partition(&:odd?).flatten #=>[1, 3, 5, 2, 4, 6]

works with ranges (or any enumerable) regardless of even or odd elements.

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This really doesn't work at all for the OP's request of an array of Dates. – weexpectedTHIS Sep 10 '12 at 21:14
    
Sure it does dates.partition { |date| date.day.odd? }.flatten – Joshua Cheek Sep 10 '12 at 23:40
    
No, it does not. Say the 6 days span the end of one month and the beginning of the next so that their days look like this: [30, 31, 1, 2, 3, 4]. Applying your suggestion to this would still leave 31 and 1 next to each other. – weexpectedTHIS Sep 11 '12 at 14:35

The foolish solution:

dates = (Date.today..(Date.today + 30)).to_a
begin
  ary   = dates.shuffle
  valid = (ary.select.each_with_index { |element, i| 
    ( i == ary.length-1 || (ary[i+1]  - element).abs  > 1 ) &&
    ( i == 0            || (element   - ary[i-1]).abs > 1 )
  })
end until valid.length == dates.length
ary

Only use if you couldn't care less about performance ;-)

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