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Maybe its just me but almost everytime I import an Android project it does not compile. First I need to set the Android SDK. Thats reasonable. But then, I almost always need to reset the JDK. Usually from JDK 1.4 to JDK 1.6. Now I really don't think too many people are out there developing android with JDK 1.4. Perhaps they are, but its no where on my machine, and yet its often pre-selected on every Android project I import. Its an annoying extra step, and I cannot imagine xCode doing something like this. Does anyone know why Eclipse does this?

Now some of these projects are not the most recent. But what makes me think this is an eclipse issue is that often the error is that it won't compile because its not version 1.6 Which means that it must have been developed with the JDK 1.6. Its usually an error involving @Override that I see saying it can't be used without JDK 1.5 or 1.6+. I then check the JDK setting for the project and sure enough its at JDK 1.4. Never 1.5, Never 1.3.

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When was the last time you updated your Eclipse and ADK ? –  Swayam Sep 10 '12 at 18:45
    
Eclipse IDE for Java Developers Version: Indigo Service Release 2 Build id: 20120216-1857 (c) Copyright Eclipse contributors and others 2000, 2012. All rights reserved. Visit eclipse.org This product includes software developed by the Apache Software Foundation apache.org –  Code Droid Sep 10 '12 at 18:47
    
What is your default compiler compliance level for your workspace (Preferences > Java > Compiler > Compiler compliance level)? –  CommonsWare Sep 10 '12 at 18:49
    
Just checked its 1.6 –  Code Droid Sep 10 '12 at 18:50
    
@swayam My machine is a few months old, my install was less than a few months ago, updates have nothing to do with JDK 1.4 being selected unless there was something really wrong with the initial download. –  Code Droid Sep 10 '12 at 18:59
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1 Answer

Set the project's JRE to an Execution Environment. It's an extra layer of indirection that keeps you from referencing a JRE by its name in your particular workspace, helping make the project more easily shared.

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So you are saying that whoever shares a project should set the JDK in this manner. That might help, but few would know to do this. –  Code Droid Sep 10 '12 at 19:14
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