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I've got a question regarding public and private variables in a Javascript Object. Here's the simple code I've been playing with to get my head around variable scope as well as private and public properties.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>Object Test</title>
    <script>
        var o = document.getElementById("output");
        var fred = new Object01("Fred");
        var global = "Spoon!";

        function Object01(oName)
        {
            var myName = oName;
                            this.myName = "I'm not telling!";
            var sub = new subObject("underWorld");
            this.sub = new subObject("Sewer!");         

            Object01.prototype.revealName = function()
            {
                return "OK, OK, my name is: " + myName + ", oh and we say " + global;
            }

            Object01.prototype.revealSecretName = function()
            {
                console.log ("Private: ");
                sub.revealName();
                console.log("Public: ");
                this.sub.revealName();
            }
        }

        function subObject(oName)
        {
            var myName = oName;
            this.myName = "My Secret SubName!";

            subObject.prototype.revealName  = function()
            {
                console.info("My Property Name is: " + this.myName);
                console.info("OK, my real name is: " + myName + ", yeah and we also say: " + global);
            }
        }


    </script>
</head>
<body>
<div id="output">
</div>
</body>
</html>

So the funny thing that I've observed so far is within my objects, a plain var is treated as private (obviously, since they are in a function block), and a "this" version is public. But I've noticed that the a variable with the same name with this.xxx seems to be considered a difference variable... So in the above example, my object "fred" will report something different for this.myName, versus if I use my function to pull my "var myName". But this same behavior isn't the same for a sub-object I create. So, in the case of "var sub" vs "this.sub", both above use a "new subObject" call to supposedly make 2 subObjects. But it seems both "this.sub" and "var sub" return the "Sewer!" version. So, I'm a bit confused about why if I use Strings for "this.myName" and "var myName" I get two different results, but my attempt to do the same with another object doesn't produce a similar result? I guess it could be that I'm using them wrong, or not understanding the differences between a this and var version.

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this is why shadow variables are considered a bad practice :P –  jbabey Sep 10 '12 at 19:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your biggest problem here isn't actually the difference between this-based object properties and var-declared variables.

Your problem is that you're trying to make prototype act as a wrapper that will give you protected class properties which are available to sub-classes, let alone instances of your main class.

prototype can not work on "private" members of a class at all (that being the variables defined within the scope of the constructor function, rather than being properties added to the constructed object you're returning).

function Person (personName) {
    var scoped_name = personName;

    this.name = "Imposter " + scoped_name;
}


Person.prototype.greet = function () { console.log("Hi, I'm " + this.name + "!"); };


var bob = new Person("Bob");
bob.greet(); // "Hi, I'm Imposter Bob!"

The point of the prototype string is either to provide methods which operate on the publicly-accessible properties of your objects (like if you wanted to change the value of this.name, but you'd forever lose the hidden scoped_name reference)...

...or if you want ALL of the same kind of object to have access to the SAME value.

function Student (name, id) {
    function showIDCard () { return id; }
    function greet () { console.log("I'm " + name + ", and I attend " + this.school); }

    this.showID = showIDCard;
    this.greet = greet;
}


Student.prototype.school = "The JS Academy of Hard-Knocks";
Student.prototype.comment_on_school = function (feeling) {
    console.log("I " + feeling + " " + this.school);
}

var bob = new Student("Bob", 1);
var doug = new Student("Doug", 2);
var mary = new Student("Mary", 1);


mary.school = "The JS School of Closure";



bob.greet(); // I'm Bob and I attend The JS School of Hard-Knocks
mary.greet(); // I'm Mary and I attend the JS School of Closure
mary.comment_on_school("love"); // I love The JS School of Closure

prototype has defined a default value for school, for Students who aren't given their own. prototype also provided functions which can be shared between objects, because the functions use this to access the actual properties of the object.

Any internal variables of the function can ONLY be accessed by properties or methods which are defined INSIDE of the function.

So in this case, the prototype methods can NEVER access id, except through this.showID, because this.showID is a reference to the showIDCard function, which is created for each and every single student, who has their own unique id, and their own copy of that function has a reference to their own unique copy of that argument.

My suggestion for applying large-scale "class" methodology to JS is to go with a style which favours composition of objects. If you're going to sub-class, make each sub-class a module, with its own public-facing interface, and its own privately-scoped vars, and then make that module the property of whatever you were trying to make, rather than trying to get chains of inheritance working.

That is way, way too much work in JS, if you're anticipating doing something like inheriting from a base-class, and then extending it 8 or 10 generations. It will just end in tears, and complaints that JS isn't "OOP" (in the style you'd like it to be).

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Thanks Norguard, your explanation with Esailija have given me a much clearer picture of how this stuff all works! –  dchin Sep 10 '12 at 21:19
    
@dchin You can get loads of benefit out of closure patterns. Even nesting them, as needed, to achieve all kinds of things (this becomes a necessity when you start dealing with asynchronous development, or multi-threaded development through web-workers). Your instances don't even need to be made using this. The most dynamic solutions don't. For example, a function with a private-static (think serial-key): var makeIDCard = (function () { var id = 0; return function (name, image) { id += 1; return { getName : function () { return name; }, getID : function () { return id;} }; }; }()); –  Norguard Sep 10 '12 at 23:41
    
@dchin You'll need to copy that and paste it into an editor to see it straight -- I think I closed it all properly. But what you get is a function which runs immediately (like an init/constructor function in another language), and instantly returns the inner function to the value of the outer var. The inner function still has access to the id var. Nothing else in the whole program will ever have access. Because the inner-function is returned instantly, it becomes the "makeIDCard" function, which returns ID objects, with name and id numbers. var bobCard = makeIDCard("Bob", "bob.jpg"); –  Norguard Sep 10 '12 at 23:45
    
Due to a brainfart, what I actually meant to demonstrate was this: makeIDCard = (function () { var id = 0; return function (name, image) { id += 1; var myID = id; return { getName : function () { return name; }, getID : function () { return myID;}, getImage : function () { return image; }, toString : function () {/*HTML serialization here*/} }; }; }()); but didn't, partly due to fundamental lack of space in these comments. Now each ID object has access to its own myID, rather than the current state of the static id. –  Norguard Sep 10 '12 at 23:53
    
Thank you, that helps a lot! It amazes me the number of ways you can approach a problem like this in Javascript! –  dchin Sep 11 '12 at 12:20

There's no private or public, there's variables and object properties.

Variables and object properties are different in many more ways than the one of variables having a variable scope and object properties not having a variable scope. Variable scope is not the same as private property of an object, because it's not a property but a variable.

Variables do not belong to any object but they can be sustained through closures. You can invoke those closures as a property of any object or without any object at all and the supposed private properties will work:

function A() {
    var private = 0;

    this.setPrivate = function( value ) {
        private = value;    
    };

    this.getPrivate = function() {
        return private;
    };
}

var a = new A();

a.getPrivate() //0;

var b = [];

b.fn = a.setPrivate; //The function is fully promiscuous, especially since the data is closed over by it,
                    //so it doesn't matter at all where or how it's invoked.

b.fn(1);

a.getPrivate(); //1

You are redefining functions in a prototype object every time the constructor is called. The whole point of prototypes is that you only have to create certain function objects just once. You are assigning methods to the prototype object inside a function, so every time that function is called, the functions are recreated and form new closures that refer to specific state.

I showed above that closures, because they hold state in the closed over variables, don't care about how they are invoked. So when you assign a closure as a property to the prototype, all the instances you have refer to the latest closure assigned, and you are getting its state.

I recommend using the standard way of defining "classes" in JS and not mixing it up with closures:

function A() {
    this._private = 1;
}
//Note, this code is outside any function
//The functions assigned to prototype are therefore only defined once.
A.prototype.getPrivate = function() {
    return this._private;
};

A.prototype.setPrivate = function( value ) {
    this._private = value;
};

var a = new A();

You can find a good tutorial here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Guide/Details_of_the_Object_Model

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the clarification Esailija. I think I'm starting to see the issue... I suppose one of my problems is trying to apply my traditional knowledge of OOP to Javascript, which really doesn't quite apply. I didn't realize that the prototype functions should have been outside of the main function, so that's very interesting! –  dchin Sep 10 '12 at 20:54

Actually, I advocate using a non-standard approach to defining javascript classes. The following coding convention makes code easy to read and understand for anyone with an object-oriented background; it is also very easy to maintain unlike the Method.prototype=function(){}; method which sucks anytime you want to rename a class, add more methods, understand the hierarchy of a class or even re-interpret what your own code is doing.

Instead, you can declare object-oriented structures using the following architecture:

/**
* public class Animal
**/
(function(namespace) {
    var __class__ = 'Animal';

    /**
    * private static:
    **/
    var animalCount = 0;

    /**
    * public Animal(string name)
    **/
    var constructor = function(name) {

        // here you can assert arguments are correct
        if(arguments.length == 0) {
            return global.error('needs a name');
        }

        /**
        * private:
        **/
        var animalIndex = animalCount++;

        /**
        * public:
        **/
        var operator = {
            speak: function() {
                console.log('?');
            },
            getName: function() {
                return name;
            },
            getAnimalIndex: function() {
                return animalIndex;
            },
        };

        return operator;
    };

    /**
    * public static Animal()
    **/
    var global = namespace[__class__] = function() {
        // new Animal();
        if(this !== namespace) {
            // construct a new instance of this class
            instance = constructor.apply(this, arguments);
            return instance;
        }
        // Animal();
        else {
            // return the last instantiation of this class
            return instance; // or do whatever you want
        }
    };

    /**
    * public static:
    **/
    // overrides the default toString method to describe this class from a static context
    global.toString = function() {
        return __class__+'()';
    };

    // prints a message to the console's error log
    global.error = function() {
        var args = Array.prototype.slice.apply(arguments);
        args.unshift(__class__+':');
        console.error.apply(console, args);
    };
})(window);

/**
* publc class Dog extends Animal
**/
(function(namespace) {
    var __class__ = 'Dog';

    /**
    * private static:
    **/
    var dogCount = 0;

    /**
    * public Dog()
    **/
    var construct = function(name) {

        /**
        * private:
        **/
        var dogIndex = dogCount++;

        /**
        * public operator() ();
        **/
        var operator = new Animal(name);

        /**
        * public:
        **/

        // overrides parent method 'speak'
        operator.speak = function() {
            console.log(operator.getName()+': bark!');
        };

        // method returns value of private variable
        operator.getSpeciesIndex = function() {
            return dogIndex;
        };

        return operator;
    };

    /**
    * public static Dog()
    **/
    var global = namespace[__class__] = function() {

        // new Dog();
        if(this !== namespace) {
            // construct a new instance of this class
            instance = construct.apply(this, arguments);
            return instance;
        }

        // Dog();
        else {
            // return the last instantiation of this class
            return instance; // or do whatever you want
        }
    };
})(window);


/**
* publc class Cat extends Animal
**/
(function(namespace) {
    var __class__ = 'Cat';

    /**
    * private static:
    **/
    var catCount = 0;

    /**
    * public Cat()
    **/
    var construct = function(name) {

        // here you can assert arguments are correct
        if(arguments.length == 0) {
            return global.error('needs a name');
        }

        /**
        * private:
        **/
        var catIndex = catCount++;

        /**
        * public operator() ();
        **/
        var operator = new Animal(name);

        /**
        * public:
        **/

        // overrides parent method 'speak'
        operator.speak = function() {
            console.log(name+': meow!');
        };

        // method returns value of private variable
        operator.getSpeciesIndex = function() {
            return catIndex;
        };

        return operator;
    };

    /**
    * public static Cat()
    **/
    var global = namespace[__class__] = function() {

        // new Cat();
        if(this !== namespace) {
            // construct a new instance of this class
            instance = construct.apply(this, arguments);
            return instance;
        }

        // Cat();
        else {
            // return the last instantiation of this class
            return instance; // or do whatever you want
        }
    };
})(window);

Now with the above classes declared: Animal, Dog extends Animal, and Cat extends Animal... We get the following:

new Dog(); // prints: "Animal: needs a name" to error output

var buddy = new Dog('Buddy');
buddy.speak(); // prints: "Buddy: bark!"

var kitty = new Cat('Kitty');
kitty.speak(); // prints: "Kitty: meow!"

var oliver = new Dog('Oliver');
oliver.speak(); // prints: "Oliver: bark!"


buddy.getSpeciesIndex(); // returns 0;
buddy.getAnimalIndex(); // returns 0;

kitty.getSpeciesIndex(); // returns 0;
kitty.getAnimalIndex(); // returns 1;

oliver.getSpeciesIndex(); // returns 1;
oliver.getAnimalIndex(); // returns 2;

I provide this javascript coding convention solely as a means to maintain organized object-oriented structures. I do not boast the performance of such coding style over other conventions, but if you want performance from your code I strongly suggest using Google's Closure Compiler which will optimize the same.

I have derived this javascript coding style from many years of coding experience on my own and the assimilation of critiquing other's code. I swear by it's robustness and modularity and welcome any comments regarding otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your example, that's a very interesting method I've never seen before, I'll give that a shot! –  dchin Sep 11 '12 at 12:18
    
Thanks, this is interesting. I find it a bit cryptic though... Could you explain a bit more? Is there a way so that there is not a copy of the public functions on every instance? Also do I understand it right that the global instance is used by all classes and thus could be overwritten with something that isn't an animal? Do we not need it if we oblige the user to use the new keyword? –  nus Jul 21 '13 at 15:10

You goofed. Constructors should not change the prototype. Either:

function subObject(oName)
{
    var myName = oName;
    this.myName = "My Secret SubName!";

}

subObject.prototype.revealName  = function()
{
    console.info("My Property Name is: " + this.myName);
    console.info("OK, my real name is: " + myName + ", yeah and we also say: " + global);
}

Or:

function subObject(oName)
{
    var myName = oName;
    this.myName = "My Secret SubName!";

    subObject.revealName  = function()
    {
        console.info("My Property Name is: " + this.myName);
        console.info("OK, my real name is: " + myName + ", yeah and we also say: " + global);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
subObject.revealName doesn't work, this.revealName does –  Korikulum Sep 10 '12 at 20:31
    
So, this is interesting, so with the prototype outside of the closure, I no longer have access to the var myName, and can only access the this.myName. –  dchin Sep 10 '12 at 20:56
    
Hmm, actually, thinking about this for a moment, how would I gain access to my parent's variables? Should I pass a reference to the parent to subObject? –  dchin Sep 10 '12 at 21:01

Blake's answer inspired me, but I found it not doing everything that I wanted, so I hacked away at it until I have something that covers most of the OOP features of C++ in a simple and elegant syntax.

The only things not supported at the moment (but it's a matter of implementing them):

  • multiple inheritance
  • pure virtual functions
  • friend classes

See the github repo for examples and a serious readme:

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