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If my response to errors in a try/catch block is to redirect users to an error page, the try/catch block behaves as if there was an error when there was not. If I change it to do something else, the code works fine.

Example:

try
{
    //do this SQL server stuff
}
catch
{
   Response.Redirect(error.htm)
   //Change this to lblErr.Text = "SQL ERROR"; and the code in try works fine.
}

From another post I learned there was a boolean overload to the Response.Redirect() method. I tried both true and false and the try/catch block still behaved as if there were an error.

What's the deal?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

When you Response.Redirect, that throws a ThreadAbortException. So to get the outcome you are describing you'll want to mod your code as follows:

try  
{
   // Do some cool stuff that might break
}
catch(ThreadAbortException)
{

}
catch(Exception e)
{
  // Catch other exceptions
  Response.Redirect("~/myErrorPage.aspx");
}
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1  
By the way, there is a KB article on this very topic at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/312629‌​. –  Joshua Sep 10 '12 at 20:00
    
Your code seems a bit off; it's basically exactly what the OP has. I'm not sure what you are going for with it. –  Andrew Barber Sep 10 '12 at 20:05
    
Wow.. Um.. Trying.. not .. to .. be.. snarky... LOL... Just kidding. His Try/Catch block would catch all acceptions and attempt to handle them the same way. (Editing...) This code snippet will basically tell the app to ignore ThreadAbortExceptions, which will inevitably be thrown when he calls Response.Write. Then it handles any other Exception type the same way that he wanted. –  Joshua Sep 10 '12 at 20:11
1  
The Exception in question is actually being thrown at the call to Response.Redirect(). By default, it throws a ThreadAbortException. So it would not be caught by that; an exception thrown inside a catch handler will go on up the stack. –  Andrew Barber Sep 10 '12 at 20:15
1  
It appears that this is the only thing that solves my problem. –  Sephethus Sep 11 '12 at 13:23
Response.Redirect("url");

By design this will terminate the calling thread by throwing an exception.

Response.Redirect("url", false);

Will prevent the exception from being thrown, however will allow the code to continue executing.

Using

Response.Redirect("url", false);
HttpContext.Current.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest();

Will redirect the user and stop execution without throwing an exception.

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This didn't work either. Still behaves as if there was an exception. –  Sephethus Sep 11 '12 at 13:20

You should use the HandleError attribute.

[HandleError]
public ActionResult Foo(){
    //...

    throw new Exception(); // or code that throws execptions

    //...
}

That way exceptions automatically cause redirection to an error page.

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The question makes it seem like the OP is not using MVC. –  Andrew Barber Sep 10 '12 at 20:03

You forgot the quotes and the semi-colon:

Response.Redirect("error.htm");
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