Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need a function, is_an_integer, where

"12".is_an_integer? returns true
"blah".is_an_integer? returns false

how can i do this in ruby? i would write a regex but im assuming there is a helper for this that i am not aware of

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Test if string is a number in Ruby on Rails –  Jakob S Sep 17 '13 at 11:01

11 Answers 11

up vote 56 down vote accepted

You can use regular expressions. Here is the function with @janm's suggestions.

class String
    def is_i?
       !!(self =~ /\A[-+]?[0-9]+\z/)
    end
end

An edited version according to comment from which:

class String
    def is_i?
       /\A[-+]?\d+\z/ === self
    end
end
share|improve this answer
4  
Not bad. In Ruby you usually omit the "return" keyword if the return value is generated in the last expression in the function. This will also return an integer value of zero, you probably want a boolean, so something like !!(str =~ /^[-+]?[0-9]+$/) would do that. Then you could add it to String and leave out the argument, using "self" instead of "str", and then you could change the name to "is_i?" ... –  janm Aug 5 '09 at 22:16
2  
Thanks! I have absolutely no clue about ruby conventions and practices. I just did a quick google on ruby and regular expressions to see the syntax, changed the regex to apply to the problem at hand, and tested it. It's pretty neat actually .. I may have to give it a longer look when I have more spare time. –  Rado Aug 5 '09 at 22:21
    
You've got the right idea, but it doesn't match binary or hex literals (see my edited solution below). –  Sarah Mei Aug 6 '09 at 3:56
    
Sarah, that's not a bug, that's a feature! –  janm Aug 6 '09 at 7:51
14  
Two comments. You can use /regexp/ === self instead of the !!(self =~ /regexp/) construct. You can use character class '\d' instead of [0-9] –  wich Sep 24 '12 at 1:24

Well, here's the easy way:

class String
  def is_integer?
    self.to_i.to_s == self
  end
end

>> "12".is_integer?
=> true
>> "blah".is_integer?
=> false

EDIT: I don't agree with the solutions that provoke an exception to convert the string - exceptions are not control flow, and you might as well do it the right way. That said, my solution above doesn't deal with non-base-10 integers. So here's the way to do with without resorting to exceptions:

  class String
    def integer? 
      [                          # In descending order of likeliness:
        /^[-+]?[1-9]([0-9]*)?$/, # decimal
        /^0[0-7]+$/,             # octal
        /^0x[0-9A-Fa-f]+$/,      # hexadecimal
        /^0b[01]+$/              # binary
      ].each do |match_pattern|
        return true if self =~ match_pattern
      end
      return false
    end
  end
share|improve this answer
8  
"01".to_i.to_s != "01" –  sepp2k Aug 5 '09 at 21:37
    
Couldn't you replace self.to_i.to_s == self with Integer self rescue false ? –  Meredith L. Patterson Aug 5 '09 at 21:38
1  
You could, but that would be bad form. You don't use exceptions as control flow, and no one's code should ever contain "rescue false" (or "rescue true"). Some simple gsub'ing would make my solution work for edge cases not specified by the OP. –  Sarah Mei Aug 5 '09 at 22:06
2  
I know a lot of people use it, and it's certainly aesthetically pleasing. To me though it's an indication that the code needs restructuring. If you're expecting an exception...it's not an exception. –  Sarah Mei Aug 6 '09 at 3:59
1  
I agree that exceptions should not be used as control flow. I don't think that the requirement is that developer oriented numbers be recognized. In non-programmer situations that could be seen as a bug, especially given that possible confusion around leading zeros and octal. Also not consistent with to_i. Your code doesn't handle the "-0123" case. Once you do handle that case, you don't need a separate regexp for octal. You can simply further by using "any?". The only statement in your function could be "[ /re1/, /re2/, /re3/ ].any? { |re| self =~ re }", with no if clauses or returns. –  janm Aug 6 '09 at 7:49

You can use Integer(str) and see if it raises:

def is_num?(str)
  begin
    !!Integer(str)
  rescue ArgumentError, TypeError
    false
  end
end

Addendum: It should be pointed out that while this does return true for "01", it does not for "09", simply because 09 would not be a valid integer literal.

share|improve this answer
15  
Dude...provoking an exception just to convert a number? Exceptions are not control flow. –  Sarah Mei Aug 5 '09 at 22:05
14  
They aren't, but unfortunately this is the canonical way to determine "integerness" of a string in Ruby. Methods using #to_i are just too broken because of it's permissiveness. –  Avdi Aug 5 '09 at 22:17
8  
For those wondering why, Integer("09") is not valid because the "0" makes it octal, and 9 is not a valid octal number. osdir.com/ml/lang.ruby.general/2002-08/msg00247.html –  Andrew Grimm Aug 5 '09 at 23:25
13  
Sarah: you can use a Regex but in order to handle all the cases that Ruby does when parsing integers (negative numbers, hex, octal, underscores e.g. 1_000_000) it would be a very big Regex and easy to get wrong. Integer() is canonical because with Integer ()you know for sure that anything that Ruby considers an integer literal will be accepted, and everything else will be rejected. Duplicating what the language already gives you is arguably a worse code smell than using exceptions for control. –  Avdi Aug 6 '09 at 14:32
2  
@Rado So is reinventing the wheel. –  sepp2k May 20 at 20:13

You can do a one liner:

str = ...
int = Integer(str) rescue nil

if int
  int.times {|i| p i}
end

or even

int = Integer(str) rescue false

Depending on what you are trying to do you can also directly use a begin end block with rescue clause:

begin
  str = ...
  i = Integer(str)

  i.times do |j|
    puts j
  end
rescue ArgumentError
  puts "Not an int, doing something else"
end
share|improve this answer
1  
With regard to the topic "exception as control flow": since we do not know how the method at hand is to be used we cannot really judge whether exceptions would fit or not. If the string is input and it is required to be an integer, then providing a non integer would warrant an exception. Although then maybe the handling is not in the same method and we would probably just do Integer(str).times {|i| puts i} or whatever. –  Robert Klemme Aug 6 '09 at 7:07
class String
  def integer?
    Integer(self)
    return true
  rescue ArgumentError
    return false
  end
end
  1. It isn't prefixed with is_. I find that silly on questionmark methods, I like "04".integer? a lot better than "foo".is_integer?.
  2. It uses the sensible solution by sepp2k, which passes for "01" and such.
  3. Object oriented, yay.
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for naming it #integer?, -1 for cluttering up String with it :-P –  Avdi Aug 5 '09 at 21:45
1  
Where else would it go? integer?("a string") ftl. –  August Lilleaas Aug 5 '09 at 21:47
    
String#integer? is the kind of common patch that every Ruby coder and their cousin likes to add to the language, leading to codebases with three different subtly incompatible implementations and unexpected breakage. I learned this the hard way on large Ruby projects. –  Avdi Aug 5 '09 at 21:51
    
Same comment as above: exceptions shouldn't be used for control flow. –  Sarah Mei Aug 5 '09 at 22:08
    
Downside: this solution is wasting one conversion. –  Robert Klemme Jan 31 at 17:02
  def isint(str)
    return !!(str =~ /^[-+]?[1-9]([0-9]*)?$/)
  end
share|improve this answer

personally I like the exception approach although I would make it a little terser.

class String
  def integer?(str)
    !!Integer(str) rescue false
  end
end

However as others have already stated this doesn't work with Octal strings...

share|improve this answer
"12".match(/^(\d)+$/)      # true
"1.2".match(/^(\d)+$/)     # false
"dfs2".match(/^(\d)+$/)    # false
"13422".match(/^(\d)+$/)   # true
share|improve this answer
1  
It doesn't return true and false but MatchData instances and nil –  Stefan Sep 17 '13 at 13:19
    
It is not what it returns, but if it matches –  Maciej Krasowski Aug 8 at 9:40

The Best and Simple way is using Float

val = Float "234" rescue nil

Float "234" rescue nil #=> 234.0

Float "abc" rescue nil #=> nil

Float "234abc" rescue nil #=> nil

Float nil rescue nil #=> nil

Float "" rescue nil #=> nil

Integer is also good but it will return 0 for Integer nil

share|improve this answer
    
@downvoter can you explain ? –  shiva Nov 19 at 3:44

Although explicit use of the case equality operator should be avoided, Regexp#=== looks very clean here:

def integer?(str)
  /\A[+-]?\d+\z/ === str
end

integer? "123"    # true
integer? "-123"   # true
integer? "+123"   # true

integer? "a123"   # false
integer? "123b"   # false
integer? "1\n2"   # false
share|improve this answer

Expanding on @rado's answer above one could also use a ternary statement to force the return of true or false booleans without the use of double bangs. Granted, the double logical negation version is more terse, but probably harder to read for newcomers (like me).

class String
  def is_i?
     self =~ /\A[-+]?[0-9]+\z/ ? true : false
  end
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.