Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to create a header file as such:

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

typedef void (^RevealBlock)();

@interface BFTasksViewController : UITableViewController <UITableViewDataSource, UITableViewDelegate> {
@private
    RevealBlock _revealBlock;
}

- (id)initWithTitle:(NSString *)title withRevealBlock:(RevealBlock)revealBlock;

@end

But I get this warning:

Redefinition of typedef 'RevealBlock' is a C11 feature

Is this something to be worried about? I'm looking at the GHSidebarNav project, which seems to use it just fine.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You must have declared RevealBlock somewhere else, as i don't see any import other than UIKit/UIKit.h, check you project .pch file for conflicting headers (or could it be that you removed some headers to make the snippet shorter ?).

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks! So I used it in the app delegate's header file and I think that's what was triggering the warning. Instead, I moved the definition to the .pch file and deleted all other definitions. – joslinm Sep 10 '12 at 21:36

Is this something to be worried about?

If you are compiling a C or ObjC program and the compiler does not support C11, then the compiler should reject the program (GCC 4.2-Apple/LLVM as an example you or somebody using your program may be using). Note that C++ has supported multiple definitions for many years.

Of course, these definitions which appear in multiple files must always match where you use them as the same type. Otherwise, the compiler may set the parameters up incorrectly before the call is made.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.