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A friend and I are using Qt Creator with Boost to build a game engine. So far we have this idea that the engine is going to be a shared library, with the idea that we can run it with a test executable which will turn into the game we eventually want to make.

The problem is header files, mainly. I'd like to find some way for Qt Creator to be able to recognize the header files as soon as the latest builds of the engine have been built or even when they're added. At first I was thinking a script in Python which executed as a build step in Qt Creator after the engine had been built, would simply copy the header files to a system directory (/usr/include, for example - if operating on a *nix system), where the IDE would then recognize the header files when linking the engine with the test executable, and we'd also have full auto completion support.

Of course, environmental variables would be used, and while I prefer developing in Linux, my friend prefers Windows, so we agreed to take care of development in regards to our respective platform preferences.

While this seems like a good solution, I think this Python script idea may be over kill. Is there a better way to do this?

Update

From to the suggested Qmake script, I end up getting this error.

cp -f "/home/amsterdam/Programming/atlas/Engine/AtlasEngine/"AtlasEngine_global.h "/" 
cp: cannot create regular file `/AtlasEngine_global.h': Permission denied
make: Leaving directory `/home/amsterdam/Programming/atlas/Engine/AtlasEngine__GCC__Linux__Debug'
make: *** [libAtlasEngine.so.1.0.0] Error 1
15:20:52: The process "/usr/bin/make" exited with code 2.
Error while building project AtlasEngine (target: Desktop)
When executing build step 'Make'

My adjustments look as follows:

# Copy over build artifacts
SRCDIR = $$ATLAS_PROJ_ROOT
DESTDIR  = $$ATLAS_INCLUDE

# Look for header files there too
INCLUDEPATH += $$SRCDIR

# Dependencies: mylib. Only specify the libs you depend on.
# Leave out for building a shared library without dependencies.
#win32:LIBS += $$quote($$SRCDIR/mylib.dll)
# unix:LIBS += $$quote(-L$$SRCDIR) -lmylib

DDIR = \"$$SRCDIR/\" #<--DEFAULTS
SDIR = \"$$IN_PWD/\"

# Replace slashes in paths with backslashes for Windows

win32:file ~= s,/,\\,g
win32:DDIR ~= s,/,\\,g
win32:SDIR ~= s,/,\\,g

for(file, HEADERS) {
    QMAKE_POST_LINK += $$QMAKE_COPY $$quote($${SDIR}$${file}) $$quote($$DDIR) $$escape_expand(\\n\\t)
}
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2 Answers 2

I'm not sure if anyone else would be having issues with this, but for whatever reason Qmake wasn't able to access my user specified environment variables properly.

So, since this was the case, one solution I came up with was to add the variables as Qmake configuration variable.

If you're in a UNIX based system, the first thing you're going to want to do is append the location of qmake - which should lie in your QtSDK folder - to your system $PATH, like so:

export PATH=$PATH:/path/to/QtSDK/...../qmake_root

From there, you can do something along the lines of:

qmake -set "VARIABLE" "VALUE"

In this case, I simply did:

qmake -set "ATLAS_PROJ_ROOT" $ATLAS_PROJ_ROOT.

And then I accessed it in my Qmake project file (.pro) with:

VAR = $$[ATLAS_PROJ_ROOT]

More info can be found here.

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I have managed to overcome this using some Qmake magic that works cross-platform. It copies over the shared libraries (either .dll or .so files) along with the header files to a directory in a directory dll at a level next to your current project.

Put this in the end of your .pro files and change the paths/libs accordingly.

# Copy over build artifacts
MYDLLDIR = $$IN_PWD/../dlls
DESTDIR = \"$$MYDLLDIR\"

# Look for header files there too
INCLUDEPATH += $$MYDLLDIR

# Dependencies: mylib. Only specify the libs you depend on.
# Leave out for building a shared library without dependencies.
win32:LIBS += $$quote($$MYDLLDIR/mylib.dll)
 unix:LIBS += $$quote(-L$$MYDLLDIR) -lmylib

DDIR = \"$$MYDLLDIR/\"
SDIR = \"$$IN_PWD/\"
# Replace slashes in paths with backslashes for Windows
win32:file ~= s,/,\\,g
win32:DDIR ~= s,/,\\,g
win32:SDIR ~= s,/,\\,g
for(file, HEADERS) {
    QMAKE_POST_LINK += $$QMAKE_COPY $$quote($${SDIR}$${file}) $$quote($$DDIR) $$escape_expand(\\n\\t)
}

Then adjust the LD_LIBRARY_PATH in the 'Run settings' of your project to point to that same dll directory (relatively).

Yes, it's ugly with escaping for paths with spaces and backslashes, but I found this to be working well cross-platform. Windows (XP, 7) and Linux tested. And yes it includes environment settings to be changed for running your project, but at least you don't need external (Python) scripts anymore or to install it to system directory requiring root privileges.

Improvements are welcome.

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Wow, thanks! I'll test it out soon. –  blissfreak Sep 10 '12 at 21:03
    
Ok, tested it but it's not working. I updated my post with the changes I made. Do you have any idea why it could be the case? –  blissfreak Sep 10 '12 at 22:24
    
@aboutblank For some reason it is copying over to / on your system to where it does not have permission to write to (no surprise). Are you sure you specified a correct $$ATLAS_INCLUDE path somewhere else in your project file? $$DDIR in the for loop seems to be / in your case. –  gertvdijk Sep 10 '12 at 22:36
    
Well, $$ATLAS_INCLUDE is actually a system environment variable. Am I accessing it incorrectly? –  blissfreak Sep 10 '12 at 22:38
    
@aboutblank As far as I know, $$MYVAR in Qmake does not access an environment variable MYVAR from the system, but only uses a Qmake namespace. Try this, this or stick to my approach. –  gertvdijk Sep 10 '12 at 23:02

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