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I am trying to extract sales of products from my database by price range.

I have a fairly complex SQL query, which works:

SELECT 
    SUM((t.price-t.discount)*t.quantity) as totalValue, 
    MAX(t.price) as maxP, 
    t.range AS score_range,  
    COUNT(*) AS count  
        FROM 
            (SELECT products.price, 
            salesRecords.discount,
            salesRecords.quantity,  
                CASE WHEN products.price >=0 AND products.price <50 THEN  '0-49' 
                WHEN products.price >=50 AND products.price <100 THEN  '50-99' 
                WHEN products.price >=100 AND products.price <200 THEN  '100-199' 
                WHEN products.price >=200 AND products.price <350 THEN  '200-349' 
                WHEN products.price >=200 AND products.price <350 THEN  '200-349'  
                WHEN products.price >=350 AND products.price <500 THEN  '350-499' 
                WHEN products.price >=500 AND products.price <800 THEN  '500-799' 
                WHEN products.price >=800 AND products.price <1200 THEN  '800-1199' 
                WHEN products.price >=1200 AND products.price <1800 THEN  '1200-1799' 
                WHEN products.price >=1800 AND products.price <2500 THEN  '1800-2499' 
                ELSE '2500 +' END 
            AS  range  FROM salesRecords 
                LEFT JOIN products ON products.id=salesRecords.itemNo 
                ORDER BY products.price DESC)t 
    GROUP BY t.range 
    ORDER BY maxP DESC

Hopefully, you can see what's going on here. We're grouping products within price ranges, summing the sales values and therefore getting an output like this:

totalValue  maxP         score_range    count   
8381    251.17       200-349        35
32522   199.00       100-199        198
22614   99.95        50-99      271
41825   49.99        0-49       2765

However, as you can see, with this particular dataset, there's a number of gaps.

I have values only for score_ranges 200-349, 100-199,50-99, 0-49 missing any data for 35-499, 500-799 etc. This is because there is no data for those values... which is fine... except... I am injecting this data as a JSON object into an AmCharts Radar Chart and in order for the data to truly make sense for my application, I need to have all the ranges, and simply populate them with zeros, so what I want to get is:

totalValue  maxP     score_range    count   
0       3500         2500 +             0
0       2499         1800-2499          0
0       1799         1200-1799          0
0       1199         800-1199           0
0       799          500-799            0
0       499          350-499            0
8381    251.17       200-349            35
32522   199.00       100-199            198
22614   99.95        50-99              271
41825   49.99        0-49               2765
share|improve this question
1  
sql cannot generate data that isn't there to begin with. You could create a temp table listing each of those score ranges and somehow join it against your actual results. that'd give you the "missing" ranges with some zero/null results for them. –  Marc B Sep 10 '12 at 20:56
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1 Answer

You need a driving table so you have all ranges. Here is an example:

SELECT tsum.totalValue, 
       maxP, 
       range.range AS score_range,  
       coalesce(count, 0) count  
FROM (select '0-49' as range union all
      select '50-99' union all
      . . .
     ) as range left outer join
     (SELECT SUM((t.price-t.discount)*t.quantity) as totalValue, 
             MAX(t.price) as maxP, 
             t.range AS score_range,  
             COUNT(*) AS count
      from (SELECT products.price, 
                   salesRecords.discount,
                   salesRecords.quantity,  
                   (CASE WHEN products.price >=0 AND products.price <50 THEN  '0-49' 
                         WHEN products.price >=50 AND products.price <100 THEN  '50-99' 
                         WHEN products.price >=100 AND products.price <200 THEN  '100-199' 
                         WHEN products.price >=200 AND products.price <350 THEN  '200-349' 
                         WHEN products.price >=200 AND products.price <350 THEN  '200-349'  
                         WHEN products.price >=350 AND products.price <500 THEN  '350-499' 
                         WHEN products.price >=500 AND products.price <800 THEN  '500-799' 
                         WHEN products.price >=800 AND products.price <1200 THEN  '800-1199' 
                         WHEN products.price >=1200 AND products.price <1800 THEN  '1200-1799' 
                         WHEN products.price >=1800 AND products.price <2500 THEN  '1800-2499' 
                         ELSE '2500 +'
                    END) AS  range
            FROM salesRecords LEFT JOIN
                 products
                 ON products.id=salesRecords.itemNo 
           )t
     ) tsum
     on ranges.range = tsum.score_range
GROUP BY ranges.range 
ORDER BY maxP DESC

However, this example suggests that you really wand to have a Ranges table, with the limits for the range defined. Then you can do the whole case statement as a join.

share|improve this answer
    
That's interesting. I'd be happy to have a ranges table. Would those joins work in MySql though? –  Jamie Hartnoll Sep 10 '12 at 21:03
    
Yes. The "on" condition would be a non-equijoin, requiring a full table scan. However, the table would be small so the performance should not be that much worse than the case statement. –  Gordon Linoff Sep 10 '12 at 21:09
    
Reading this on my iPad now so I can't try it, but I'll investigate tomorrow. your example doesn't look right to me for MySql, but I'm a quite new effectively using table joins, so I'll reserve judgement til I've tried it!! –  Jamie Hartnoll Sep 10 '12 at 21:15
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