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What is the meaning of the following assignment, please?

var self = this, textDropZone;

I would understand, if we assign only one value to var self; either this or textDropZone. However, what does it mean, if two values are assigned in the same line? Does it mean, they are added?

If you would provide me with some reference, that would help too. Thank you.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is creating two variables, self = this and textDropZone (which is not initialized).

To expand further, it is likely setting self = this because there is likely a nested scope in which they may need to access the parent scope's members.

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@schmiddty: +1, Thank you for your answer. All the answers are correct, and because all of them are the same, I will select the first one and mark it as the Acceptable Answer. It means I am marking this one. I am assigning all the other answers +1 too. –  Bunkai.Satori Sep 10 '12 at 21:12

It's equivalent to:

var self = this;
var textDropZone;
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You can declare more than one variable with a var statement.

var self = this, textDropZone;

is the same as

var self = this;
var textDropZone;
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It's shorthand for writing:

var self = this;
var textDropZone;

You're assigning self to a value, and setting up a new variable (textDropZone) that does not have a value assigned.

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means the same thing as

var sel = this;
var textDropZone;

Article explaining it and the problems of using that format.

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The great Douglas Crockford enforces the more terse format, with a single var, with JSLint –  ColinE Sep 10 '12 at 21:12

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