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This is going to be a big shot in the dark.

A client has an application that is incredibly outdated. It's running at one of their client's offices. The app contains a lot (hundreds of thousands) of images viewable from a proprietary interface.

So, those images are in some odd "proprietary" format. The whole goal of this is to be able to pull and convert all of the images so the data stored within the app can be transferred to their updated system. Now, quotation marks were placed around proprietary because we know that it isn't proprietary, rather, it's in some other format that we can't identify. The application does make use of an old version of ImageGear (GEAR32SD.DLL is bundled with the app).

This is a hex dump of an image file containing only one white pixel:

50 50 03 00 01 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 52 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 96 00 96 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 53 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 00 01 00 01 f0 00 00 00 e5 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 1c 35

This is a hex dump of an image file containing only one black pixel:

50 50 03 00 01 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 52 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 96 00 96 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 54 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 00 01 00 01 f0 00 00 00 e5 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 35 40 35

The leading 50 50 03 is present in every file.

If this looks even remotely familiar, please pipe up. At this point we haven't got a lot left to try. We just want our images.

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1  
what does file say? Have you tried imagemagicks identify? garykessler.net/library/file_sigs.html doesn't provide any hints. Proprietary? –  Fredrik Pihl Sep 10 '12 at 21:27
    
I gave it a shot, file says "data", identify says "no decode delegate for this image format". –  rodion Sep 10 '12 at 21:43
    
That link's a GREAT resource...thank you! –  circuitBurn Sep 12 '12 at 12:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Find the image viewer your client uses and reverse engineer that program. RE'ing the images is just guessing/fuzzing, versus RE'ing a parser where you actually have a chance at success.

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We unfortunately don't have access to the source for the viewer :( –  circuitBurn Sep 10 '12 at 22:06
    
But do you have the viewer's binary? You can then use a disassembler like objdump or IDA to reverse engineer how the viewer interpreted the file. Of course you would need experience in binary reverse engineering to do this. –  mattypiper Sep 13 '12 at 16:47

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