Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Below is python code where I am trying to get reservations information from the Reservations Model.

    i=0
    for c in courts:
        court = names[i]
        i=i+1
        c_key=c.key()
        logging.info("c_key: %s " % c_key)
        weekday_key= db.Key.from_path('Courts', 'c_key', 'Days', weekday)
        logging.info("weekday_key: %s " % weekday_key)
        logging.info("weekday: %s " % weekday)
        logging.info("court: %s " % court)
        reservation = db.Query(Reservations)
        nlimit=2*len(times)
        reservations = reservation.fetch(limit=nlimit)
        logging.info("reservations: %s " % len(reservations))

There are only two court entities in my Courts database, court1 and court2. There also only 14 weekday entities in my Days database, 7 for court1 and 7 for court2, named Sunday, ... , Saturday. In the current example I am trying to get the key for the 2 Monday Days, one for court1 and one for court2. I don't understand why according to the log below, I am getting the same weekday_key for the two different courts which have different keys c_key themselves.

In the log below, whether I put into the db.Key.from_path( command 'c_key' or 'court' I get exactly the same result, which shows that the values of the 2 weekday_keys are identical, not different as I expected.

INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,189 views.py:226] c_key: ag1kZXZ-c2NoZWR1bGVycicLEglMb2NhdGlvbnMiBlJvZ2VycwwLEgZDb3VydHMiBmNvdXJ0MQw 
INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,189 views.py:228] weekday_key: ag1kZXZ-c2NoZWR1bGVyciELEgZDb3VydHMiBWNfa2V5DAsSBERheXMiBk1vbmRheQw 
INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,189 views.py:229] weekday: Monday 
INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,189 views.py:230] court: court1 
INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,192 views.py:235] reservations: 1 
INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,192 views.py:226] c_key: ag1kZXZ-c2NoZWR1bGVycicLEglMb2NhdGlvbnMiBlJvZ2VycwwLEgZDb3VydHMiBmNvdXJ0Mgw 
INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,192 views.py:228] weekday_key: ag1kZXZ-c2NoZWR1bGVyciELEgZDb3VydHMiBWNfa2V5DAsSBERheXMiBk1vbmRheQw 
INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,192 views.py:229] weekday: Monday 
INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,192 views.py:230] court: court2 
INFO     2012-09-10 21:25:19,195 views.py:235] reservations: 1 

My Models are as follows.

class Courts(db.Model):    #parent is Locations, courtname is key_name
    location = db.ReferenceProperty(Locations)
    timezone = db.StringProperty()

class Days (db.Model):    #parent is Courts, name is key_name, day of week
    court = db.ReferenceProperty(Courts)
    startTime = db.ListProperty(int)
    endTime = db.ListProperty(int)

class Reservations(db.Model):    #parent is Days, hour, minute HH:MM is key_name
    weekday = db.ReferenceProperty(Days)
    day = db.IntegerProperty()
    nowweekday = db.IntegerProperty()
    name = db.StringProperty()
    hour = db.IntegerProperty()
    minute = db.IntegerProperty()
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're calculating the keys using the string 'c_key' each time, not the value of the variable c_key.

However even if you fix this it still won't work, since you want the ID of the court, not the full key path.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, from you answer I understand that the db.Key.from_path() command needs key_names as inputs, not keys. So, my problem is that with my ancestor scheme where the Reservations are great-grandchildren of Locations (Locations have children [Courts] which have children [(week)Days] which have children [Reservations]. All 4 levels have key_names which are unique among their own siblings, but may not be unique relative to other families. How do I construct a query for all Reservations on a specific day in Days at a specific court in Courts on a specific weekday in (week)Days? –  zerowords Sep 11 '12 at 0:25
    i=0
    for c in courts:
        court_id = names[i]
        i=i+1
        weekday_key = db.Key.from_path('Courts', c.key().name(), 'Days', weekday)
        reservation=Reservations.all()
        reservation.ancestor(weekday_key)
        nlimit=2*len(times)
        reservations = reservation.fetch(limit=nlimit)

What I don't like about this answer is that weekday_key is the same for all c in courts. That does not seem right.

share|improve this answer
    
I have found that my "answer" above fails when two different venues have courts with the same name; reservations for one court show up on all identically named courts. –  zerowords Sep 11 '12 at 13:38

How do I construct a query for all Reservations on a specific day in Days at a specific court in Courts on a specific weekday in (week)Days?

You know the values for the keys so you make up a key by hand (so to speak) and then make your query with that key as the ancestor.

So for example:

key = ndb.Key(BlogPost, 12345)
qry = Comment.query(ancestor=key)

but here you'd use something like

key = ndb.key(Locations, "Place1", Courts, "Name_Of_Court") 
result = Reservations.query(ancestor=key)

and so on, so you are working your way down the chain and building the key with all the information you have (i.e what court they want to reserve). Then the results of your ancestor query will be those models that have the key you passed as their ancestors.

https://developers.google.com/appengine/docs/python/ndb/queries#ancestor

share|improve this answer
    
Is your answer dependent on using ndb instead of db; I have not used ndb so I am not familiar with it and don't know how to change or the consequences. And, my situation deals with more ancestor layers than you have explained, so will the key have more pairs in it, or what? Also, I have found that my "answer" above fails when two different venues have courts with the same name; reservations for one court show up on all identically named courts. –  zerowords Sep 11 '12 at 13:23
    
To be more specific about more ancestor layers, the key you have produced here using Locations and Courts would relate to (week)Days and then I need another step to get to Reservations. I don't know whether that requires another query or a longer key, or what. Can you say? –  zerowords Sep 11 '12 at 13:46
    
The key can be as long as you like, so as to include all the relevant ancestors. I stopped at two for brevity's sake, but you can add all you have used so far. I just was not 100% sure what the ordering was so I used what was clear to me. I believe the situation is very similar for db instead of ndb. developers.google.com/appengine/docs/python/datastore/… –  Paul Collingwood Sep 11 '12 at 14:13
    
Paul's answer is correct and I can do the same without ndb, with db. The key for me in his solution is creating the key= using 3 pairs of Model,key_name for both the put() and for the for the fetch(...). For a while I was not using the full 3 pairs for the put() and the datastore was getting lost. –  zerowords Sep 11 '12 at 18:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.