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What one query can produce table_c?

I have three columns: day, person, and revenue_per_person. Right now I have to use two queries since I lose 'person' when producing table_b.

table_a uses all three columns:

SELECT day, person, revenue_per_person
FROM purchase_table
GROUP BY day, person

table_b uses only two columns due to AVG() and GROUP BY:

SELECT day, AVG(revenue) as avg_revenue
FROM purchase_table
GROUP BY day

table_c created from table_a and table_b:

SELECT 
   CASE 
   WHEN revenue_per_person > avg_revenue THEN 'big spender'
   ELSE 'small spender'
   END as spending_bucket
FROM ????
share|improve this question
    
What database are you using? –  Gordon Linoff Sep 11 '12 at 0:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe this could help, try this one

SELECT a.day,
    CASE 
        WHEN a.revenue_per_person > b.avg_revenue THEN 'big spender'
        ELSE 'small spender'
   END as spending_bucket
FROM
    (
        SELECT day, person, AVG(revenue) revenue_per_person
        FROM purchase_table
        GROUP BY day, person
    ) a INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT day, AVG(revenue) as avg_revenue
        FROM purchase_table
        GROUP BY day
    ) b ON a.day = b.day
share|improve this answer

You might want to use analytic functions. An Oracle example showing if a person's salary is greater than average salary in his department.

08:56:54 HR@vm_xe> ed                                                     
Wrote file s:\toolkit\service\buffer.sql                                  

  1  select                                                               
  2    department_id                                                      
  3    ,employee_id                                                       
  4    ,salary                                                            
  5    ,avg_salary                                                        
  6    ,case when salary > avg_salary then 1 else 0 end case_is_greater   
  7  from (                                                               
  8    select                                                             
  9       department_id                                                   
 10      ,employee_id                                                     
 11      ,salary                                                          
 12      ,round(avg(salary) over(partition by department_id),2) avg_salary
 13    from employees                                                     
 14  )                                                                    
 15* where department_id = 30                                             
08:58:56 HR@vm_xe> /                                                      

DEPARTMENT_ID EMPLOYEE_ID     SALARY AVG_SALARY CASE_IS_GREATER           
------------- ----------- ---------- ---------- ---------------           
           30         114      11000       4150               1           
           30         115       3100       4150               0           
           30         116       2900       4150               0           
           30         117       2800       4150               0           
           30         118       2600       4150               0           
           30         119       2500       4150               0           

6 rows selected.                                                          

Elapsed: 00:00:00.01
share|improve this answer

If you are using a database that supports windows functions, you can do this as:

SELECT (CASE WHEN revenue_per_person > avg_revenue THEN 'big spender'
             ELSE 'small spender'
        END) as spending_bucket
FROM (select pt.*,
             avg(revenue) over (partition by day, person) as revenue_per_person,
             avg(revenue) over (partition by day) as avg_revenue,
             row_number() over (partition by day, person order by day) as seqnum
      from purchase_table pt
     ) t
where seqnum = 1

The purpose of seqnum is to just get one row per person/day combination.

share|improve this answer
    
sir question, why does window function doesn't use group by clause? –  John Woo Sep 11 '12 at 1:09
1  
@JohnWoo . . . You can find documentation for windows functions in any database that supports them (SQL Server, Oracle, Postgres, DB2, Teradata, for example). The syntax uses partition by, which is similar to group by. –  Gordon Linoff Sep 11 '12 at 1:15

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