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The generic implementation of flood-fill algorithm runs into stack overflow, is there any way to optimize this? I am using this algorithm to find distinct void zones within building models. I voxelize these models then parse through voxelized results reprsented through a simplified version of 0s and 1s. The 0s and 1s represent whether the voxel is present or not. 0s being present and 1s being absent. Then I have to find distinct subsets of connected 0s, in other words, the connected void spaces within the 3D building.

sample 2D input data example stored in list, a 3D would be multiple entries within the list. (Z, Y, X) = (0, 4, 9)

11000111
11000000
10001110
10111110

Wikipedia suggested several remedy but I have no idea how to implement them. Here's the existing algorithm, I have already set the "sys.setrecursionlimit(10000)" for much denser data. Which is fine for some, but for even denser ones (Z, Y, X) = (50, 46, 22) or bigger as the building model gets much more complex with hundreds of rooms, I get the stack overflow message

Error stack overflow will happen in the recursive function:

File "ZoneFinding3D_Baselined.py", line 104, in findZero
if (0 <= row < row_len) and (0 <= col < col_len) and (0 <= z < height_len) and (col, row, z) not in walked:
MemoryError: Stack overflow

Code:

    def findZero(subset_in, col, row, z, height_len, col_len, row_len, layers3D, walked, output):
    if (0 <= row < row_len) and (0 <= col < col_len) and (0 <= z < height_len) and (col, row, z) not in walked:
        walked.append((col, row, z))
        if layers3D[z][row][col] == 0: #layers3D is in format (z, row, col) which is the actual hierarchy of input data, Z, Y, X
            if subset_in is not None:
                subset = subset_in
            else:
                subset = []

            subset.append((col, row, z))
            findZero(subset, col+1, row, z,  height_len, col_len, row_len, layers3D, walked, output)
            findZero(subset, col, row+1, z,  height_len, col_len, row_len, layers3D, walked, output)
            findZero(subset, col-1, row, z,  height_len, col_len, row_len, layers3D, walked, output)
            findZero(subset, col, row-1, z,  height_len, col_len, row_len, layers3D, walked, output)
            findZero(subset, col, row, z+1,  height_len, col_len, row_len, layers3D, walked, output)
            findZero(subset, col, row, z-1,  height_len, col_len, row_len, layers3D, walked, output)

            if subset_in is None:
                output.append(subset)

def checkThrough(layers3D, gridSizes):
    walked = []
    output = []
    countX=0; countY=0; countZ=0
    for z in range(0, gridSizes[2]):
        for row in range (countY, countY+gridSizes[1]):
            for col in range (0, gridSizes[0]):
                col_len = gridSizes[0]
                row_len = gridSizes[1]
                height_len = gridSizes[2]

                if (col, row, z) not in walked: #walked takes format of (col, row, z), modified from (z, row, col)
                    findZero(None, col, row, z, height_len, col_len, row_len, layers3D, walked, output)
    return output
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2  
Use BFS instead of DFS? –  K Mehta Sep 11 '12 at 1:06
1  
use iteration instead of recursion –  Joran Beasley Sep 11 '12 at 1:10
    
Use one of the Alternative implementations discussed in the Wikipedia article on the Flood fill algorithm. –  martineau Sep 11 '12 at 3:13

1 Answer 1

You can use scipy.ndimage.label to do this quickly:

import numpy as np
from scipy.ndimage import label
a = np.random.randint(0, 2, (4, 6))
b = label(a)
print a
print b

the output is:

[[1 0 1 1 0 0]
 [1 0 0 0 0 0]
 [1 1 0 0 0 1]
 [0 1 1 0 1 1]]
(array([[1, 0, 2, 2, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 3],
       [0, 1, 1, 0, 3, 3]]), 3)

label() finds all connected 1s, so you need to reverse 0 & 1 for your data first.

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