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(Sorry about the title, couldn't think of how to explain it)

So I have an Olympic database, the basic layout is that there's a competitors table with competitornum, givenname, and familyname (other columns aren't necessary for this) There's also a results table with competitornum, and place (between 1 and 8).

I'm trying to get the givenname and familyname and total number of gold, silver, and bronze medals (place = 1, 2 or 3)

It also needs to only display the results with the top number of medals, and all of this without using the Order By clause...

I asked this question before but realised I forgot to say some things, but the previous answer before the bold part was added was:

SELECT c.Givenname, c.Familyname, COUNT(r.places) AS TotalPlaces
FROM Competitors c INNER JOIN Results r
    ON r.Competitornum = c.Competitornum
WHERE r.place IN (1,2,3)
GROUP BY c.Givenname, c.Familyname

I'm thinking it needs another subquery like

AND TotalPlaces = (SELECT MAX(TotalPlaces))

but I'm not sure how to use an alias in a subquery when it's above the subquery...

All help is appreciated, thanks!

EDIT: The official question on my assignment (I can't figure out the answer, I've really tried, that's why I'm here):

Which competitor(s) got the largest number of medals (counting gold, silver and bronze all together)? List their given and family names and the total number of their medals (only).

Warning: your solution must not assume that competitor names are always different Do not use an ORDER BY clause, in any part of this query.

share|improve this question
    
"all of this without using the Order By clause"?? That's like saying I want to learn how to swim but don't put water in the pool! Or....is this homework? (If you truly have a good reason why not to use Order By, shouldn't you state that in the question?) –  lc. Sep 11 '12 at 1:43
    
It's an assignment, and I can't figure it out D: I don't think we need the order by clause though –  Corey Thompson Sep 11 '12 at 1:44
    
And as a side hint: "GROUP BY c.Givenname, c.Familyname" and "your solution must not assume that competitor names are always different" are contradictory. –  lc. Sep 11 '12 at 1:48
    
I hope that doesn't mean people won't give me an outright answer especially if I can't work out the answer from their hints D: Also, I didn't add the GROUP BY, and I think I told the person that said that after he answered it. (And thanks for adding the tag, I'm new here :) –  Corey Thompson Sep 11 '12 at 1:49
    
Using group by is correct. And you have to group by the names because you're selecting them. But I think you want to group by something else too. Something that's guaranteed to be unique for every competitor, even if the names are the same. –  lc. Sep 11 '12 at 1:54

2 Answers 2

You need to have another subquery for this,

SELECT c.Givenname, c.Familyname, COUNT(r.places) AS TotalPlaces
FROM Competitors c 
INNER JOIN Results r ON r.Competitornum = c.Competitornum
WHERE r.place IN (1,2,3)
GROUP BY c.Givenname, c.Familyname
HAVING COUNT(r.places) = 
            (
                SELECT MAX(TotalPlaces)
                FROM
                (
                    SELECT COUNT(g.places) AS TotalPlaces
                    FROM Competitors f 
                    INNER JOIN Results g ON f.Competitornum = g.Competitornum
                    WHERE g.place IN (1,2,3)
                    GROUP BY f.Givenname, f.Familyname
                )
            )
share|improve this answer
1  
Beat me to it. :) –  lc. Sep 11 '12 at 1:52
    
The program is saying there's an error at the very last group by... speaking of, since we have to assume the names could be the same, aren't we suppose to not group by the names? To fix that I suppose I could group by competitornum, givenname, familyname? But I'm not allowed to show competitornum in the output... –  Corey Thompson Sep 11 '12 at 1:54
    
@CoreyThompson You don't have to select something to group by it, so you are correct to add competitornum to the list. :) –  lc. Sep 11 '12 at 1:55
1  
...shouldn't the GROUP BY clause come before the HAVING clause? –  lc. Sep 11 '12 at 1:56
    
@lc. Okay so my only problem now is, the program won't run the query because it's saying "Unknown token GROUP"... I have no idea why it wouldn't recognise that, I can't see any problems above it... (The problem is line 17 - the last GROUP BY) –  Corey Thompson Sep 11 '12 at 1:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The final answer (thanks to John Woo and lc.) Pasted this here for anyone that comes across this question in the future:

SELECT c.Givenname, c.Familyname, COUNT(r.place) AS TotalPlaces
FROM Competitors c 
INNER JOIN Results r ON r.Competitornum = c.Competitornum
WHERE r.place IN (1,2,3)
GROUP BY c.competitornum, c.Givenname, c.Familyname
HAVING COUNT(r.place) = 
            (
                SELECT MAX(TotalPlaces)
                FROM
                (
                    SELECT COUNT(r.place) AS TotalPlaces
                    FROM Competitors c 
                    INNER JOIN Results r ON r.Competitornum = c.Competitornum
                    WHERE r.place IN (1,2,3)
                    GROUP BY c.competitornum, c.Givenname, c.Familyname
                )
            )
share|improve this answer
    
what's the problem with my answer? –  John Woo Mar 14 '13 at 5:10

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