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I'm defining a module Foo and I am instantiating it within another module Bar. I have a third module Other which I'd like to provide with the same instance of Foo that Bar created and modified.

define('Foo', [], function() {
    var test = function() {
        this.foo = 'foo';        
    };

    return test;
});

define('Bar', ['Foo'], function(Foo) {
    Foo = new Foo();
    Foo.bar = 'bar';
    console.log('From bar', Foo);
});

define('Other', ['Foo'], function(Foo) {
    console.log('From the other', Foo);
});


require(['Foo', 'Bar', 'Other'], function(Foo, Bar, Other) {
    console.log('Bringing it all together');
});

http://jsfiddle.net/radu/Zhyx9/

Without require, I would be doing something like:

App = {};

App.Foo = function() {
    this.foo = 'foo';
}

App.Bar = function() {
    App.Foo = new App.Foo();
    App.Foo.bar = 'bar';
    console.log('From bar', App.Foo);
}

App.Other = function() {
   console.log('From other', App.Foo);
}

App.Bar();
App.Other();

http://jsfiddle.net/radu/eqxaA/

I know I must be missing something here and since this is one my first forays in requirejs there is probably some sort of misunderstanding mixed in. The example may look contrived but I'm coming across something similar in shoehorning a project into using Backbone and RequireJS. ​

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3 Answers 3

What you expose from the module using return is accessible from the argument that represents that module in the requiring module

Here's your demo, modified

define('Bar', ['Foo'], function(Foo) {
    Foo = new Foo();
    Foo.bar = 'bar';

    //return instantiated Foo
    return Foo;
});


require(['Foo', 'Bar', 'Other'], function(Foo, Bar, Other) {
    //Bar is the instantiated Foo, exposed from Bar
    console.log(Bar);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, you're essentially daisy chaining dependencies. +1 since it obviously works for the posted problem. To make this work with actual code I would need to have a sort of proxy module whose only purpose is holding an instantiated copy of another module.. which feels very heavy-handed, is there really no other way? –  Radu Sep 11 '12 at 2:57

The return value from the module is what requirejs considers the exposed api. So your console.log statements are disrupting that.

You need to return something from the function like so:

define('Bar', ['Foo'], function(Foo) {
    var Bar = { my: 'bar'};
    //or maybe return a function or whatever 
    return Bar;
 });

hth

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I didn't think of that (though I do return something in my actual modules), but returning something still does not provide me with an instantiated version of Foo in Other. –  Radu Sep 11 '12 at 2:39
    
Are you bootstrapping requirejs with a config? I wonder if it is trying to resolve the file path. Typically, modules are defined by the file name and the path strategy is setup in the requirejs config. requirejs.org/docs/api.html#define –  SonOfNun Sep 11 '12 at 2:57
    
In the actual code, yes, but in the example it wasn't necessary. Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe that module names take precedence over file names. I can prove that the module resolution isn't a problem though: jsfiddle.net/radu/XEL6S. Example works fine. To clarify, the reason I'm not doing exactly that (even though it allows multiple modules to share one instance) is because I need to only instantiate it on domready.. so it can't instantiate itself. –  Radu Sep 11 '12 at 3:05
    
On that topic, I think I figured it out. I apologize for not mentioning the fact that the reason I was doing this for was domReady. That aside, I would still like to see have a solution where you can do this instance sharing arbitrarily without a proxy as Joseph suggested. –  Radu Sep 11 '12 at 3:16
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I posted this as comment to one of the answers but I was aware that I could share an instance like so:

define('Foo', [], function() {
    var test = function() {
        this.foo = 'foo';        
    };

    return new test();
});

define('Bar', ['Foo'], function(Foo) {
    Foo.bar = 'bar';
    console.log('From bar', Foo);
});

define('Other', ['Foo'], function(Foo) {
    Foo.other = 'other';
    console.log('From the other', Foo);
});


require(['Foo', 'Bar', 'Other'], function(Foo, Bar, Other) {
    console.log('Bringing it all together');
});

http://jsfiddle.net/radu/XEL6S/

However, the reason I didn't do this in the first place was that the Foo module couldn't instantiate itself as it required the DOM to be ready. However, being new to RequireJS, I wasn't aware that this sort of functionality is built in. In other words, to share an instance of a module Foo as I specified above, instantiate in its definition and add the domReady module as specified in the requireJS docs.

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