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I know for ONE thread (one socket), I cannot perform read() or write() at the same time, or can I?

But what if I create 2 thread and each of them handle read() and write() separately? I don't know in low level view, will the read() and write() obtain the socket lock, so only one operation is allowed to execute at one time? Will it?

I am using Window as the platform, but also like to know is there different in Unix machine?

I ask this question because I am confused that, why we need non-blocking IO since 2 threads are able to let us read() and write() simultaneously?

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There's a difference between "blocking" and "locking". –  Hot Licks Sep 11 '12 at 2:26
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You can do concurrent blocking I/O with a Socket. –  oldrinb Sep 11 '12 at 2:26
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"why we need non-blocking IO since 2 threads are able to let us read() and write() simultaneously?" Because the code with a single thread is simpler. –  dasblinkenlight Sep 11 '12 at 2:26
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Your title has basically nothing to do with your question. –  EJP Sep 11 '12 at 2:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I know for ONE thread (one socket), I cannot perform read() or write() at the same time, or can I?

Of course not. A thread can only call one method at a time. The question makes no sense.

But what if I create 2 thread and each of them handle read() and write() separately? I don't know in low level view, will the read() and write() obtain the socket lock, so only one operation is allowed to execute at one time? Will it?

They don't need a lock. TCP is full-duplex. You can read and write on the same socket. at the same time.

I am using Window as the platform, but also like to know is there different in Unix machine?

No.

I ask this question because I am confused that, why we need non-blocking IO since 2 threads are able to let us read() and write() simultaneously?

Make up your mind. First you asked whether it is possible, now you (correctly) say it is.

NIO allows you to handle more than one socket in the same thread. The purpose of this is conservation of threads, for example in servers that have to handle hundreds of thousands of connections.

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Threads are very expensive resources. We should try to use them sparingly and efficiently to get the most out of them.

NIO allows us to open multiple sockets on the same thread. You can basically end up with 1000 socket connections on a single thread instead of 1000 threads.

Let's take Tomcat as a real world example. Tomcat is a webserver with a JSP/Servlet container. It supports both blocking IO and non-blocking IO. With blocking IO, it maxs on 5K HTTP connections, but with NIO, it can reach 20K HTTP connections when sufficient RAM memory is available.

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Because creating thousands of threads puts a strain on JVM and system resources. With asynchronous IO, you can have a few threads monitoring lots of connections and its much more efficient.

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hi, thanks your reply. Do you mind to help me answer this? stackoverflow.com/questions/12362396/… –  GMsoF Sep 11 '12 at 4:49

for ONE thread (one socket), I cannot perform read() or write() at the same time,

You can read and write at the same time, but you can read and write in the same thread. If you expect to write a known amount of data or messages and you expect to get back a known amount of data or messages, you can write and then read in the same thread.

e.g. if you have a simple server process, you might read requests and write responses using a single thread.

I would use blocking IO for no more than a few hundred connections. If you have tens of connections or less, non-blocking IO may not be worth the extra complexity.

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