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As far as i know i can create a Server using both TCPListener and Socket so what is the difference between the two of them

Ex.Socket

    private Socket MainSock;
    MainSock = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);
    MainSock.Bind(new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, port));
    MainSock.Listen(500);
    MainSock.BeginAccept(AcceptConnections, new Wrapper());

Ex.TCPListener

        Int32 port = 13000;
        IPAddress localAddr = IPAddress.Parse("127.0.0.1");
        TcpListener server = new TcpListener(localAddr, port);
        server.Start();

I really confused, the two of them listen for connection so what is the difference between them ?

Updated Code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Sockets;
using System.Net.Security;
using System.Security.Authentication;
using System.Security.Cryptography.X509Certificates;
using System.IO;

public class Wrapper
{
    public byte[] buffer;
    public SslStream sslStream;
    public object connector;
}

public class Sock
{
    private Dictionary<string, byte> Connections;
    public event Action<Wrapper> AnnounceNewConnection;
    public event Action<Wrapper> AnnounceDisconnection;
    public event Action<byte[], Wrapper> AnnounceReceive;
    private Socket _sock;

    private X509Certificate certificate = X509Certificate.CreateFromCertFile("exportedcertificate.cer");

    public Sock(int port)
    {
        try
        {
            Connections = new Dictionary<string, byte>();
            _sock = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);
            _sock.Bind(new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, port));
            _sock.Listen(500);
            _sock.BeginAccept(AcceptConnections, new Wrapper());
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e);
        }
    }

    private void AcceptConnections(IAsyncResult result)
    {
        Wrapper wr = (Wrapper)result.AsyncState;
        try
        {
            wr.sslStream = new SslStream(new NetworkStream(_sock.EndAccept(result), true));
            wr.sslStream.BeginAuthenticateAsServer(certificate, AcceptAuthenticate, wr);

            _sock.BeginAccept(AcceptConnections, new Wrapper());
        }
        catch (Exception e) { Console.WriteLine(e); }
    }

    private void AcceptAuthenticate(IAsyncResult result)
    {
        Wrapper wr = (Wrapper)result.AsyncState;
        try
        {
            wr.sslStream.EndAuthenticateAsServer(result);
            if (wr.sslStream.IsAuthenticated == true)
            {
                AnnounceNewConnection.Invoke(wr);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e) { Console.WriteLine(e); }
    }

    private void ReceiveData(IAsyncResult result)
    {
        Wrapper wr = (Wrapper)result.AsyncState;
        try
        {
            AnnounceReceive.Invoke(wr.buffer, wr);
        }
        catch (Exception e) { Console.WriteLine(e); AnnounceDisconnection.Invoke(wr); }
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

They're just different classes that do the same thing, written at different levels. Under the hood the TCPListener undoubtedly calls something very like your first Socket-based code. It;s just there to hide you from some of the gory details.

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TcpListener is a convenient wrapper for TCP communications. This allows you to use TcpClient for accepted connections--although you can accept sockets instead of clients to use Socket instead of TcpClient. You can do the same thing with Socket; but you have to deal with some of the TCP-specifics (like SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp). TCP is a stream-based protocol and TcpClient recognizes that by letting you do stream communications by providing a stream with TcpClient.GetStream(). Socket is at a higher different level and needs to support many different protocols like UDP that aren't stream based.

TcpClient.GetStream returns a NetworkStream object that is suitable for SslStream; so, it should be much less work than using Socket directly. The documentation for SslStream details using TcpListener and TcpClient for SSL communications.

share|improve this answer
    
in my Asynchronous socket class i used to use socket.BeginReceive to begin receive every message sent from the client. but now after i wrapped my socket class with sslstream to secure the connection idk what is the equivalent of .BeginReceive in ssl –  Roman Ratskey Sep 12 '12 at 0:49
    
So please i want you to help me on my updated code above in the main post –  Roman Ratskey Sep 12 '12 at 0:49
    
@TorlanOther If you're using SslStream, you'd want to use SslStream.BeginRead –  Peter Ritchie Sep 12 '12 at 0:52
    
every time i try to use this on the above code i get no data idk why could you see my code because i really need your help i am too confused why it did not work –  Roman Ratskey Sep 12 '12 at 0:54
    
i don't get the message only i get an empty message, 1000+++ spaces –  Roman Ratskey Sep 12 '12 at 1:00

A TcpListener wraps a socket, and is the server-side analog to the TcpClient (which also, of course, wraps a socket).

The TcpListener is preconfigured with TCP (as opposed to the Socket, which can be used with UDP, pure IP, non-IP protocols, etc.) and gives you a TcpClient when handling a connection.

If you're not sure if you need a Socket, and are using TCP - I'd strongly suggest starting with TcpListener/Client as it's a much easier to use interface.

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I want to use SSL Stream but idk how could i use .GetStream with the socket class [First Example] –  Roman Ratskey Sep 11 '12 at 14:30
    
@TorlanOther - first, you need a stream on top of the socket: System.Net.NetworkStream will give you that. Then, construct an SslStream on top of the NetworkStream. –  Mark Brackett Sep 11 '12 at 14:56
    
so you mean on the AcceptConnections Callback i make a network stream that gets the stream from the AsyncResult, then i use .GetStream with SSLStream ? –  Roman Ratskey Sep 11 '12 at 15:30
    
see my updated code i now can accept connections and authenticate with SSL stream after edited my code as you told me but still can't receive data so please help me –  Roman Ratskey Sep 11 '12 at 22:46
    
@TorlanOther - I don't see anywhere you're actually reading from the stream. I presume that's in the unshown event handlers? –  Mark Brackett Sep 13 '12 at 16:06

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