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I'm messing around with C++ extern templates to speed up compilation. I've noticed that Visual Studio 2012 has made some improvements in its handling of extern template, but I'm still finding issues. Here's an example:

main.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "Calc.h"

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    Calc<int> c1;
    cout << c1.add(1, 2) << endl;
}

Calc.h:

#pragma once

template <class A_Type>
class Calc
{
public:
    A_Type add(A_Type x, A_Type y)
    {
        return x + y;
    }
};

extern template class Calc<int>;

Normally I'd include Calc.cpp with template class Calc<int>;, ensuring the template is only instantiated once. For this example, I am only compiling Main.cpp and expecting it to fail.

The problem is, Visual Studio 2012 will happily compile and link the code above. It's not respecting the extern template. The only solution I've found is to do this in the header:

Calc.h:

#pragma once

template <class A_Type>
class Calc
{
public:
    A_Type add(A_Type x, A_Type y);
};

template <class A_Type> A_Type Calc<A_Type>::add(A_Type x, A_Type y)
{
    return x + y;
}

extern template class Calc<int>;

Visual Studio fails to link if the header is like this (complaining about a missing definition for Calc<int>::add, as expected). However, g++ 4.6.3 Fails to link either of these examples.

Who is right? If both the prototypes and definitions of functions in a class are specified in the same header file, is there really a difference? Is there any way to specify the "shorter-form" Calc.h and have it fail as expected in Visual Studio 2012 (as well as gcc)?

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1  
Your first example doesn't include extern, is something missing? –  Mark Ransom Sep 11 '12 at 2:55
    
Oops, bad copy/paste ;) Thanks! –  jmacdonagh Sep 11 '12 at 3:01

1 Answer 1

A compiler is free to inline any function that it has the definition for, if it chooses to do so. Once it is inlined there is no need for another definition in another file.

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Sure, but in this case I know it is not being inlined. Are you saying a function can only be inlined if my header is defined the first way? –  jmacdonagh Sep 11 '12 at 3:33
    
@jmacdonagh, how do you know it's not being inlined? As I said, the compiler is free to make the decision to inline no matter how you declared it, as long as it has the definition at the point of use. –  Mark Ransom Sep 11 '12 at 3:38
    
In this case, I've verified with both the Visual Studio debugger and IDA pro that the functions are not being inlined. I'm testing with a Debug build. If I build for Release I'm sure it would be inlined. –  jmacdonagh Sep 11 '12 at 13:40

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