Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This would mean that the class was initialized, but the variables were not set.

A sample Class:

public class User {

    String id = null;
    String name = null;

    public String getId() {
        return id;
    }
    public void setId(String id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

The actual class is huge that I prefer not to check if(xyz == null) for each of the variables.

share|improve this question
    
You can use reflection –  0xSina Sep 11 '12 at 3:12
2  
if(id == null) is the best method. –  AVD Sep 11 '12 at 3:13
    
Reference fields are initialized to their default value, null, in the absence of an explicit initializer. –  oldrinb Sep 11 '12 at 3:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try something like this:

public boolean checkNull() throws IllegalAccessException {
    for (Field f : getClass().getDeclaredFields())
        if (f.get(this) != null)
            return false;
    return true;            
}

Although it would probably be better to check each variable if at all feasible.

share|improve this answer
    
Performance wise, is this far behind the if(variable==null) method? –  th3an0maly Sep 12 '12 at 10:07
    
Yes, it will likely take a lot longer than if (var == null). –  arshajii Sep 12 '12 at 11:00
    
that looks like a nice hack –  user1710917 Oct 2 '12 at 16:49

"Best" is such a subjective term :-)

I would just use the method of checking each individual variable. If your class already has a lot of these, the increase in size is not going to be that much if you do something like:

public Boolean anyUnset() {
    if (  id == null) return true;
    if (name == null) return true;
    return false;
}

Provided you keep everything in the same order, code changes (and automated checking with a script if you're paranoid) will be relatively painless.

Alternatively (assuming they're all strings), you could basically put these values into a map of some sort (eg, HashMap) and just keep a list of the key names for that list. That way, you could iterate through the list of keys, checking that the values are set correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
But if I do this, I'm gonna have to edit the method each time I add a field to the class. Besides, a generic method can be put in an abstract class and extended to be used in all other Value Objects –  th3an0maly Sep 12 '12 at 10:08
    
Yes, you will. I'm not sure why you think that's a problem. You know what fields you're adding, you have to create setters and getters for them. Adding a simple one extra line of checking is not a lot of extra work. –  paxdiablo Sep 12 '12 at 10:23
Field[] field = model.getClass().getDeclaredFields();     

for(int j=0 ; j<field.length ; j++){    
            String name = field[j].getName();                
            name = name.substring(0,1).toUpperCase()+name.substring(1); 
            String type = field[j].getGenericType().toString();    
            if(type.equals("class java.lang.String")){   
                Method m = model.getClass().getMethod("get"+name);
                String value = (String) m.invoke(model);    
                if(value == null){
                   ... something to do...
                }
}
share|improve this answer

The best way in my opinion is Reflection as others have recommended. Here's a sample that evaluates each local field for null. If it finds one that is not null, method will return false.

public class User {

    String id = null;
    String name = null;

    public String getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(String id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public boolean isNull() {
        Field fields[] = this.getClass().getDeclaredFields();
        for (Field f : fields) {
            try {
                Object value = f.get(this);
                if (value != null) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
            catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }


        }
        return true;

    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        System.out.println(new User().allNull());
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.