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In my app, I use UIImageView and UIScrollView to show a lot of images (every time there are about 20 images and every image is about 600px*500px and size is about 600kb).

I use this code to accomplish this function:

// Here is pictures Data;
self.klpArry = self.pictureData;

CGSize size = self.klpScrollView1.frame.size;
for (int i=0; i < [klpArr count]; i++) {
    UIImageView *iv = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake((size.width * i)+300, 20, 546, 546)];
    NSString *filePath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:[klpArr objectAtIndex:i] ofType:@"jpg"];
    UIImage *imageData = [[UIImage alloc]initWithData:[NSData dataWithContentsOfFile:filePath]];
    [iv setImage:imageData];   
    iv.backgroundColor = [UIColor grayColor];
    [self.klpScrollView1 addSubview:iv];
    imageData = nil;
    iv = nil;
    iv.image = nil;
    filePath = nil;
    [imageData release];
    [filePath release];
    [iv release];
}
    // show the picture in scrollview;
[self.klpScrollView1 setContentSize:CGSizeMake(size.width * numImage, size.height)];
self.klpScrollView1.pagingEnabled = YES;
self.klpScrollView1.showsHorizontalScrollIndicator = NO;
self.klpScrollView1.backgroundColor = [UIColor grayColor];

But every time I initialize this function, the memory will increase about 5MB. Actually I release UIImageView, UIimage and UIScrollView (vi.image=nil, [vi release]) but it doesn't work, the allocated memory is not getting released. BTW, I used my friend's code first vi.image = nil then vi = nil; but the pictures are not getting displayed on scrollview.

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I solve it with [this way][1], you can have a look . [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/10221591/… –  Geaka Sep 11 '12 at 3:42
    
@Veelian Thank you you comment, i see this code. have any demo for it?? –  Allan.Chan Sep 11 '12 at 8:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The main problem, as I see it, is that you're setting your local variables to nil and then you proceed to try to use those local variables in methods like release and the like, but because they've been set to nil, those methods now do nothing, and the objects with the +1 retainCount (or now +2 because you've added them to your view) are never released.

Thus, I'd suggest the following:

//Here is pictures Data;
self.klpArry = self.pictureData;

CGSize size = self.klpScrollView1.frame.size;
for (int i=0; i < [klpArr count]; i++) {
    UIImageView *iv = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake((size.width * i)+300, 20, 546, 546)];
    NSString *filePath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:[klpArr objectAtIndex:i] ofType:@"jpg"];
    UIImage *imageData = [[UIImage alloc]initWithData:[NSData dataWithContentsOfFile:filePath]];
    [iv setImage:imageData];   
    iv.backgroundColor = [UIColor grayColor];
    [self.klpScrollView1 addSubview:iv];

    // Don't set these to nil, or else subsequent release statements do nothing!
    // These statements are actually not necessary because they refer to local
    // variables so you don't need to worry about dangling pointers. Make sure
    // you're not confusing the purpose of setting a pointer to nil in ARC to 
    // what you're doing in your non-ARC code.
    //
    // imageData = nil;
    // iv = nil;

    // You don't want to set this to nil because if iv is not nil, your image
    // will be removed from your imageview. So, not only is this not needed,
    // but it's undesired.
    //
    // iv.image = nil;

    // This statement is not necessary for the same reason you don't do it
    // to imageData or iv, either. This is probably even worse, though, because
    // filePath is not a variable that you initialized via alloc. You should 
    // only be releasing things you created with alloc (or new, copy, mutableCopy,
    // for which you issued a retain statement).
    //
    // filePath = nil;

    [imageData release];

    // filePath is a +0 retainCount already, so don't release. You only release
    // those items for which you increased retainCount (e.g. via new, copy, 
    // mutableCopy, or alloc or anything you manually retained).
    //
    // [filePath release];

    [iv release];
}

// show the picture in scrollview;
[self.klpScrollView1 setContentSize:CGSizeMake(size.width * numImage, size.height)];
self.klpScrollView1.pagingEnabled = YES;
self.klpScrollView1.showsHorizontalScrollIndicator = NO;
self.klpScrollView1.backgroundColor = [UIColor grayColor];

Thus, your code would be simplified (and corrected) to probably just be:

//Here is pictures Data;
self.klpArry = self.pictureData;

CGSize size = self.klpScrollView1.frame.size;
for (int i=0; i < [klpArr count]; i++) {
    UIImageView *iv = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake((size.width * i)+300, 20, 546, 546)];
    NSString *filePath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:[klpArr objectAtIndex:i] ofType:@"jpg"];
    UIImage *imageData = [[UIImage alloc] initWithData:[NSData dataWithContentsOfFile:filePath]];
    [iv setImage:imageData];   
    iv.backgroundColor = [UIColor grayColor];
    [self.klpScrollView1 addSubview:iv];
    [imageData release];
    [iv release];
}

// show the picture in scrollview;
[self.klpScrollView1 setContentSize:CGSizeMake(size.width * numImage, size.height)];
self.klpScrollView1.pagingEnabled = YES;
self.klpScrollView1.showsHorizontalScrollIndicator = NO;
self.klpScrollView1.backgroundColor = [UIColor grayColor];

Or you could further simplify your code through the use of autorelease:

//Here is pictures Data;
self.klpArry = self.pictureData;

CGSize size = self.klpScrollView1.frame.size;
for (int i=0; i < [klpArr count]; i++) {
    UIImageView *iv = [[[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake((size.width * i)+300, 20, 546, 546)] autorelease];
    NSString *filePath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:[klpArr objectAtIndex:i] ofType:@"jpg"];
    UIImage *imageData = [[[UIImage alloc] initWithData:[NSData dataWithContentsOfFile:filePath]] autorelease];
    [iv setImage:imageData];   
    iv.backgroundColor = [UIColor grayColor];
    [self.klpScrollView1 addSubview:iv];
}

// show the picture in scrollview;
[self.klpScrollView1 setContentSize:CGSizeMake(size.width * numImage, size.height)];
self.klpScrollView1.pagingEnabled = YES;
self.klpScrollView1.showsHorizontalScrollIndicator = NO;
self.klpScrollView1.backgroundColor = [UIColor grayColor];

By the way, the statement (with autorelease):

UIImage *imageData = [[[UIImage alloc] initWithData:[NSData dataWithContentsOfFile:filePath]] autorelease];

could probably be simplified to:

UIImage *imageData = [UIImage imageWithContentsOfFile:filePath];

This gives you a UIImage, with a +0 retainCount (i.e. you don't have to release it) from your file.

So, a few final observations:

  1. You really should probably review and study the Advanced Memory Management Programming Guide. It's dense reading if you're new to memory management, but mastery of these concepts (especially in non-ARC code) is critical.

  2. If you haven't, I'd encourage you to run your code through the static analyzer ("Product" - "Analyze" or shift+command+B). I'd be surprised if many (if not most) of these issues wouldn't have been identified for you by the analyzer. You should have zero warnings when you run your code through the analyzer.

  3. If you want to take this to the next level, you might want to be far more conservative about your memory management. The governing principle would be a system design that only loads the images that are needed at the UI at any given time, which involves not only calvinBhai's excellent suggestion of lazy loading of images (i.e. don't load images into memory until your UI really needs them), but also a pro-active releasing images once they've scrolled off the screen. Maybe you don't need to worry about it in your app, because you're only dealing with 20 images at a time, but if any of your portfolios/galleries expanded to 100 or 1000 images, the idea of keeping all of those in memory at any given time is just a bad idea. This is a more advanced concept, so maybe you should focus on the basic memory management problems of your existing code first, but longer term, you might want to contemplate lazy loading and pro-active releasing of images.

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1  
+1 great explanation. To expand on number 3, look into tiled scroll views, where you reuse sections of your scroll view much like UITableView reuses its cells. –  Carl Veazey Sep 11 '12 at 5:21
    
@Rob Thank you for your comment, i will be Serious reading article. –  Allan.Chan Sep 11 '12 at 6:44

If memory is your concern,

try lazy loading the images = Load the visible image, the next and previous image. You dont have to have all images added to your klpscrollview.

Once you figure out lazy loading the images onto your scrollview, then you can think of fixing the images not showing on your scrollview.

Easier would be to search for "lazy load uiimage uiscrollview"

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, i will search it. but any idea to solution for my problem? –  Allan.Chan Sep 11 '12 at 3:44

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