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I'm trying to code a program that will print out a certain number of lines from a text file. I think I have the code to open the file and to scan it for how many lines it has. I'm just having trouble printing out the lines. (For example, printing lines 1 through 10 of a file.)

Should I make all the reading of the file into a separate method?

numLines is declared earlier from user input. Also I wanted to make the src open from a command line argument. Unsure if that is implemented correctly.

EDIT COMPLETE CODE IM WORKING WITH

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MAX 256


int numLines = 0;
int linecount = 0;
FILE *src = NULL;
char b[MAX];
char ch;

void GetArgs (int argc, char **argv){
if(argc != 4 || argc != 2) {
    printf("Error not enough arguments to continue \n", argv[0]);
    exit(-1);

}// end if argc doenst = 4 or 2

if(argc == 2){
    src = fopen( argv[1], "r:");
    numLines=10;

}// end argc = 2

if(argc == 4){
    if (strcmp (argv[1], "-n") !=0 ){
        numLines = atoi (argv[2]);
        src = fopen (argv[3], "r");
        if ( src == NULL){
            fputs ( "Can't open input file." , stdout);
            exit (-1);
        }
        while (NULL != fgets(ch,MAX, src)){
            linecount++;
            fputs(ch, stdout);
            if (linecount == numLines){
                break;
            }
        }

    }//end of nested if
    else (strcmp (argv[2], "-n") !=0 ){
        numLines = atoi (argv[3]);
        src = fopen (argv[1], "r");
        if ( src == NULL){
            fputs ( "Can't open input file." , stdout);
            exit (-1);
        }
        while (NULL != fgets(ch,MAX, src)){
            linecount++;
            fputs(ch, stdout);
            if (linecount == numLines){
                break;
            }
        }            


    }//end of else
}//end if argc == 4

}// end GetArgs


}// end GetArgs


int main(int argc, char **argv){



GetArgs(argc, argv);
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Sep 12 '12 at 12:05

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
That doesn't even compile! –  Alexey Frunze Sep 11 '12 at 4:58
    
What happens when you try to compile and run it? –  Yusuf X Sep 11 '12 at 5:00
    
I run into errors. I'm trying to fix all the errors that terminal gives me –  V Or Sep 11 '12 at 5:01
    
fgets() returns a null pointer on EOF. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 11 '12 at 5:12
1  
You should read up about Short, Self-Contained, Correct (Compiling) Examples and provide one. You should pay attention to your compiler's warnings. You should be getting complaints about one of fgets() or putc() — unless you've not included <stdio.h>, which would be another bad move. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 11 '12 at 5:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this

FILE * src = NULL;
int linecount = 0;
int numLines = 5;
char ch[MAX];

src = fopen( argv[1], "r" );
if ( src == NULL ) {
    fputs( "Can't open input file.", stdout );
    exit(-1);
}

while(NULL != fgets(ch,MAX,src)) {
    linecount++;
    fputs(ch, stdout);

    if (linecount == numLines) {
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have implemented your code and edit the question showing how my code looks with your code implemented. It still doesnt complile so I'm unsure if it helps. But thank you for your answer. –  V Or Sep 11 '12 at 5:58
    
#define MAX 1024 and compile it without your code, try to understand an implementation, and than use it in your code –  AGo Sep 11 '12 at 6:07
while ( fgetc(ch,MAX,src) !=EOF )

You're calling fgetc like fgets. The fgetc takes only one argument: a FILE *stream.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh okay. Thanks. I made the change and that error is gone when I try to compile. thanks again –  V Or Sep 11 '12 at 5:00
    
V Or, you should fix it the other way around, i.e. use fgetc with the right signature, the rest of your code is based on the assumption that you read one byte at a time. –  wich Sep 11 '12 at 5:23

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