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I'm a new programmer trying to teach myself C++ and OOP. Right now I'm working on a project with multiple states, and it's my first attempt at a bigger programming task/challenge. Right now I'm trying to work on a simple menu state class, but I'm not sure how to go about designing it to do what I want. Specifically, I'm a beginner programmer, and I'm not sure what data types or templates to use.

Here's a brief description of the type of menu screen that I want to make:

I'm trying to make a simple menu screen that has multiple 'menu elements' listed. Each 'menu element' contains a string (which is used to display the name of the element or item) and a function (to change states, screens, do a task, etc.). -- The other 'feature' of the menu system that I want to have is the ability for selection to wrap around. For example, if the menu has 3 items, I want the user to be able to press up and down to switch the currently selected element, and if the user is on the last element (#3) and presses down again, they wrap back around to element #1. (and vice versa..)

Now, I ~think~ that this will require me to make a new class called 'MenuElement', and a class called 'MenuState' which contains and allows the user to switch between and select a specific element.

As a new, self-taught C++ programmer, I have limited experience with some of the more advanced containers and I'm much more familiar with simple c-style arrays. I have a little bit of experience with vectors, and I know a little bit about linked lists, maps, and trees, but I'm not sure which container type to use for this situation. I've seen examples of using pointers to create a circular linked list before, but the example was in C and it seemed a little bit clumsy. Is there a specific type of contain that bests fits my problem? Or am I over-thinking it, and I should just pick one and run with it?

I think I could eventually get this system up and running using an array of MenuElements with a series of conditional statements. However, I'm really interested in actually learning how to improve my programming and design, not only so that my code runs faster, but also so that my code is clean and logically constructed.

share|improve this question
    
MenuElement fine, MenuState I'm not sure. I would have a class called Menu or MenuPicker which would hold a collection of MenuElements, the current menu state and handle the events to process the menu (keyup, keydown, enter etc.). As for the wrap around, I don't see any need to handle that in your data structure. Just handle it in code, a simple vector of MenuElements seems fine to me. Interesting extension of the task for you to think about, how would you handle sub-menus? I.e. a menu element that when you choose it opens another menu. –  john Sep 11 '12 at 5:54
    
Does a vector iterator always wrap around by default, or is it normal to use conditional statements to change the behavior of the first and last menu element? As a new programmer my tendency is to use an "MenuElement array[3]" paired with a "int currentSelection". When the program detects a keydown event, it simply increments the currentSelection by 1. Then I would use an if statement to change the behavior of the last position of the array. But this seems wrong to me... haha. –  MrKatSwordfish Sep 11 '12 at 6:11
1  
I would use an if statement. There are no circular data structures as standard in C++, and writing one just for this simple purpose seems over the top. –  john Sep 11 '12 at 6:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Wrap-around can be done with modulo arithmetic, i.e. given a private member index variable named idx_ of the active cursor into the array of menu elements, you could do have a member functions page_down() and page_up() like this

void CompositeMenu::page_down()
{
    // idx_ will always remain in the interval [0, num_elements() )
    // when idx_ equals num_elements() - 1, page_down() will yield 0 (i.e. wrap-around)
    idx_ = (idx_ + 1) % num_elements(); 
}

void CompositeMenu::page_up()
{
    // idx_ will always remain in the interval [0, num_elements() )
    // when idx_ equals 0, page_up() will yield num_elements() - 1 (i.e. wrap-around) 
    idx_ = (idx_ - 1 + num_elements() ) % num_elements() ;
}

where num_elements() is the size of the current menu.

For your general design question, a sketch of your class hierarchy would use the Composite Design Pattern (Wikipedia). This defines an abstract menu interface called IMenu and derives both CompositeMenu and a LeafMenu as concrete classes. This allows arbitrary levels of nested submenus.

class IMenu
{
public:
    virtual void SomeOperation() = 0;
};

class CompositeMenu
:
    public IMenu
{
public:
    virtual void SomeOperation() 
    { 
        // your implementation 
    }

    void page_down();  // use implementation above      
    void page_up();    // use implementation above
    int num_elements { return subMenus_.size(); }

private:
    std::vector<IMenu*> subMenus_; // list of subMenus, which can also have nested menus themselves
    int idx_; // active menu element
};

class LeafMenu
:
    public IMenu
{
public:
    virtual void SomeOperation()
    {
        // your implementation
    }
};

Note that since num_elements() is a member function that allows for dynamic updates on the subMenus (i.e. it would allow drag-and-drop of menu items).

share|improve this answer
    
That statement is undefined behaviour I believe. Modifying a variable twice in one statement. Better is ++idx; idx = idx % num_elements_; –  john Sep 11 '12 at 6:18
    
@john Tnx, updated. I now simply add or subtract 1 and then do the modulo. –  TemplateRex Sep 11 '12 at 6:26

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