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An application with same business code written in C# shall run under Windows (WPF) and Linux (GTK#, Mono).
The UI will be done separately with WPF for Windows and with GTK# for Linux.
Both application's user language shall be changeable during operation in any dialog and update all translatable text in the controls.
The translated files shall be usable for both parts. The i18n for the WPF is implemented in an own library and delivers a singleton for the current culture, whose properties contain the text. The properties are used in the binding in the XAML. Therefore a PropertyChanged event exists, what we would like to have on the GTK# side too. And we want to run the application in Monodevelop on Windows for debugging purposes as well. There is only one dialog open, if the language is changeable/changed.

The text files are written in the manner:
<Namespace>.<Classname>.<Property> = translated text.
The code shall not be extended too much for each translated control/UI item.
What are the possiblities?

Is there a good link describing i18n with GTK# for Windows and Linux?

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1 Answer 1

Code Generation by XSLT from UI Definition File gui.stetic (option for XAML)

We implemented an idea, that works quite well.

The GUI definition in GTK# is in the XML file gtk-gui/gui.stetic (WPF has XAML files). The idea was to generate additional code files by XSLT.

The additionally generated code supports i18n with our Translator class. Derived classes from Translator deliver properties, that change its values, if the culture is changed.

Each text, that can be translated, in the XML file gtk-gui/gui.stetic is easily extractable:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<stetic-interface>
  <!-- ... -->
  <widget class="Gtk.Bin" id="NameSpaceXy.MenuWidget" design-size="800 480">
    <!-- ... -->
    <child>
      <widget class="Gtk.VBox" id="MainVBox">
        <!-- ... -->
        <child>
          <widget class="Gtk.Button" id="CJKButton">
                <!-- ... -->
                <property name="Label" translatable="yes" context="yes" comments="commented">context hint|happiness=Ω
㗔㲀䃽䄈䄙䄜礽祉...祿福囍</property>
                <!-- ... -->
          </widget>
          <!-- ... -->
        </child>
        <!-- ... -->
      </widget>
    <!-- ... -->
 </widget>
 <widget class="Gtk.Button" id="ExitButton">
    <!-- ... -->
    <property name="Label" translatable="yes">Exit</property>
    <!-- ... -->
  </widget>
    <!-- ... -->
          <widget class="Gtk.Button" id="CJKButton">
            <!-- ... -->
            <property name="Label" translatable="yes" context="yes" comments="comment for translator">context hint for translator|happiness=㗔㲀䃽䄈䄙䄜礽祉...祿福囍</property>
            <!-- ... -->
          </widget>

    <!-- ... -->
      <widget class="Gtk.Image" id="KeyboardImage">
        <!-- ... -->
        <property name="Pixbuf">file:en-us-640x232.png</property>
        <!-- ... -->
      </widget>
    <!-- ... -->
</stetic-interface>

In the GUI designer all properties, that can be translated, will appear in the the XML file as an XML node with name property that has an attribute called translatable with value yes. The content of the node is the string, that can be translated. Additionally each such element can be decorated with a comment and a context hint for the translator - these two fields are editable in the UI designer via properties window. (An odd thing is that the context hint is prefixed to the node content, separated by a pipe character.)

  • The parent of such a property node is always a widget node
  • Each widget node contains the name and type of the Widget in its attributes.
  • The parent of such a widget node is always a child node - except it is not a child of the root node.
  • The parent of each child node is again the parent widget node.

Therefore this very simple and smart structure let find out which property of which Widget instance is translatable and where it can be found in detail.

With this information I built prebuild scripts and XSL files that:

  1. get an list of all classes, that derive from Gtk.Bin, Gtk.Window (temporary xml file)
  2. create a batch script file from that list
  3. execute that created batch script file, that executes for each class in the list:
  4. generation of XXXXXTranslation class that looks like this:

    namespace NameSpaceXy
    {
    
      public class EntryWidgetTranslation: TranslationTemplate
      {
        [Translation(@"default title")]
        public string TitleLabel_LabelProp { get; set; }
    //..
    
  5. generation of partial class for each Gtk Widget class, that contains a single method, that looks like this:

     namespace NameSpaceXy
     {
       public partial class EntryWidget: ITranslateMethod
       {
         public void Translate()
         {
           GtkUtility.SetLabel(TitleLabel, Translator.Translation<EntryWidgetTranslation>().TitleLabel_LabelProp);
           GtkUtility.SetImage(KeyboardImage, Translator.Translation<EntryWidgetTranslation>().KeyboardImage_Pixbuf);
           //..
       }
      }
    }
    
  6. finally these two generated code files (per class, that derives from Gtk.Bin/Gtk.Window/Gtk....) have to be inserted in the project file - this is done by an additional XSLT.

This works.

Advantages:

It has the advantage, that translations are extracted automatically. Each newly designed UI class derived from e. g. Gtk.Window or Gtk.Bin is automatically processed at each build. This type of i18n could be adapted to WPF with adapted XSL files.

Disadvantage:

The generated method Translate() has to be called in Gtk#, where appropriate, at least where the element is shown and at changing the language/culture, if the element is visible. (WPF/XAML would not need the Translate method due to its binding capabilities).

Translator

The Translator class is an own company internal implementation, that delivers the right string for the current set culture - here internally reading an XML file for that culture. We changed the language files to XML files, due to the advantage of Unicode and adding line breaks/multi line strings. It is now a serialized Dictionary instance.

Pictures

We added culture depending pictures as well, that can be extracted easily from the gui.stetic called XML file with this partial XPath expression property[@name='Pixbuf'][../@class='Gtk.Image'].

Environment

I run the MonoDevelop in Windows and use MsXsl.exe in the batch scripts, probably it would run in Linux too with an other XSLT processor.

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