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Style 1:

a(X) when X>1 -> 
    ...omitted;
a(X) when X ->
    ...omitted.

Style 2

a(X) ->
    case X>1 of
        true-> ...ommited;
        false-> ...ommited
    end.

====Update===

As @rviding said, I update the comparison as following:

Style 1:

a(X) when X>1 -> 
    ...omitted;
a(X) ->
    ...omitted.

Style 2

a(X) ->
    case X>1 of
        true-> ...ommited;
        false-> ...ommited
    end.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Learn You Some Erlang's section on function syntax states that function clauses and case statements are basically the same, except for one difference: pattern matching in clauses can handle more than one pattern, whereas a case statement can only handle one statement.

Apart from that, I believe it is a matter of taste. I tend to use different function clauses when the cases are really distinct (as in: the complete function will behave differently), and I use case statements when I want the code to diverge and be merged afterwards again, e.g. to calculate the value for a variable based on an expression.

Edit As pointed out by RobertAloi in the comments below, you are not really restricted when using case .. of. Also, as rvirding wrote, the compiler does some optimization when wrapping different expressions in a tuple to allow matching against them.

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Thank you. I personally tend to the function clauses as it is more clear. Your advice is well enough to make me do the decision. –  goofansu Sep 11 '12 at 7:28
4  
Function clauses are also better to debug as you can trace on them –  Lukas Sep 11 '12 at 9:09
2  
@goofansu but in this case avoid the when X guard. It will only succeed if X has the value true. –  rvirding Sep 11 '12 at 10:17
3  
@evnu, "whereas a case statement can only handle one statement": what about case {A,B,...,Z} of ... ? –  Roberto Aloi Sep 12 '12 at 8:35
    
@RobertoAloi You got me there. Your point of critique is correct. –  evnu Sep 12 '12 at 8:51

You should also consider that testing a bif result has not the exact same behavior in a guard than inside a function.

I learned this recently, for example (length(L) > -1) chrashes inside a function but not in a guard when L is an improper list.

Pascal

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Thank you for the warning –  goofansu Nov 13 '13 at 2:23

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