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First of all, apologies if you've all seen this before. I tried my hardest to try find an answer here and elsewhere.

I'm new to C and still getting my head around pointers and effective use of them.

Code (edited for brevity):

void getInFile(char fileName[], FILE *inFile) {
    inFile = fopen(fileName, "r");
    if(inFile == NULL) {
        printf("Error1");
    }
}

void function(FILE *inFile) {
    if(inFile == NULL) {
        printf("Error2");
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    FILE *inFile = 0;
    getInFile(argv[2], inFile);
    function(inFile);
}

As written, running the program gives error2. I get error1 if I change getInFile from void to FILE* return type and in the main method have:

inFile = getInFile(argv[2], inFile);

Is this an example of me using pointers incorrectly or am I doing something else wrong?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to change something in a C function, you need to pass a pointer to it and change what that points to. For example:

void xyzzy (int x, int *py) {
    x = 42;
    *py = 42;
}
:
x = y = 0;
xyzzy (x, &y);

will result in x still holding 0, and y holding 42. That's because a copy of x was passed, not the real x. Any changes you make to that copy will not be reflected back to the caller.

A copy of the pointer-to-y was also passed (C is always pass-by-value rather than pass-by-reference) but, since both that copy and the original &y point to the same y, it worked.


Now, you have to apply that to pointers as well. If you want to change a pointer, you need to pass a pointer to that pointer and dereference it, something like:

void getInFile (char fileName[], FILE **pInFile) {
    *pInFile = fopen (fileName, "r");
    if (*pInFile == NULL) {
        printf("Error1");
    }
}
:
FILE *inFile = NULL;
getInFile (argv[2], &inFile);
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phw0ar nice answer. The dark room is made light. Thank you! –  lgrevenl Sep 11 '12 at 7:05
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You need to pass the address of your FILE pointer so that the function 'getInFile' can modify it. Like this:

void getInFile(char fileName[], FILE **inFile) {
    *inFile = fopen(fileName, "r");
    if(*inFile == NULL) {
        printf("Error1");
    }
}

then in main call it with:

getInFile(argv[2], &inFile);
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void getInFile(char fileName[], FILE *inFile) {
    inFile = fopen(fileName, "r");
    if(inFile == NULL) {
        printf("Error1");
    }
}

You're passing the inFile parameter as an argument - it gets passed by value, whether or not you modify it inside the function, that operates on a copy of it, so the change would not be exposed to the world outside the function. Try passing its address (i. e. a double pointer):

void getInFile(char fileName[], FILE **inFile) {
    *inFile = fopen(fileName, "r");
    if (*inFile == NULL) {
        printf("Error1");
    }
}

FILE *ptr;
getInFile("Filename", &ptr);
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The assignment in getFile has no effect visible to the caller. You need to make the getFile(FILE **infile) and change the assignment to *infile = fopen

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getInFile(argv[2], inFile); In here, inFile is an input parameter for the function. Nothing the function does ca change it. If inFile Actually pointed at something, the function course of course change the variable pointed at, but the pointer itself cannot be changed.

This is true with all parameters, they can never be changed themselves, if you want something to be changeable you must give a pointer to it.

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