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FileReader allows to read local file in Chrome.

function readMultipleFiles(evt) {
    var files = evt.target.files;

    if (files) {
        for (var i = 0, f; f = files[i]; i++) {
            var r = new FileReader();
            r.onload = (function (f) {
                return function (e) {
                    var contents = e.target.result;
                    document.getElementById("output").innerHTML = contents;
                };
            })(f);
            r.readAsText(f);
        }
    } else {
        alert("Failed to load files");
    }
}
document.getElementById('fileinput').addEventListener('change', readMultipleFiles, false);​

Run example on jsfiddle.net

But this example does not work in Internet Explorer 9.
Does IE9 support File API?
If yes - what should I do to have ability to read local files in IE9?

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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Does IE9 support File API?

No, it doesn't.

If yes - what should I do to have ability to read local files in IE9?

Did you mean if no? If so then you could use an ActiveX or just inform the user that this feature of your website is not supported on his browser and allow him the possibility to upload the file to the server.

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Thank you for the link. I do now want to use ActiveX. I need this feature for local application that will be used by our team only. So I can just say that my application is compatible with Chrome and Mozilla. –  Vladimir Bezugliy Sep 11 '12 at 7:07
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Generally no. Reading local files is a massive security violation.

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If you make an hypertext application (.hta), you will be able to create the ActiveX object FileSystemObject, which will let you access the local file system.

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You can use ActiveX' FileSystemObject.

var fso = new ActiveXObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject");
var a = fso.CreateTextFile("c:\\testfile.txt", true);
a.WriteLine("This is a test.");
a.Close();
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