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We can easily compute the sum of digits of a given number but is there any mathematical formula or pattern we can use to determine the sum of next numbers without having to sum all the digits again and again?

For example

Sum of 1234 = 1+2+3+4 = 10
Sum of 1235 = 1+2+3+5 = 11
Sum of 1236 = 1+2+3+6 = 12

I can see some kind of pattern here but unable come up with any efficient math algorithm.

I use below method to calculate the sum of digits:

public int sum(long n) {  
    int sum = 0;   
    while (n != 0) {    
        sum += n % 10;
        n /= 10;  
    }  
    return sum;  
}

Which works fine but it is CPU intensive. I want to do this much faster. If I have a sequence of numbers, say 10->19 I should only have to count the digits for 10, then add one for each up to 19.

Is there any efficient way to calculate the sum of digits in numbers if I already have the sum of previous numbers?

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Maybe this is a question for the Mathematics Q&A. –  Anders Gustafsson Sep 11 '12 at 7:01
    
This is not a homework.I came across this while working on another problem.@Sujay I have updated my question with some methods which I use currently. @mathematician1975 sorry for the bad description of problem,i thought its straight forward problem.I have updated the question with some more details to explain it. –  WebHrushi Sep 11 '12 at 7:33
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted
DigitSum(n+1) = DigitSum(n) + 1 - (9 * NumberOfEndingZeros(n+1))

If you want to find not the digitsums of t consecutive numbers but the sum of the digitsums of t consecutive numbers (n+1, n+2, ..., n+t), it's simpler.

Sum(DigitSum(i)) for i = n+1 to n+t = a(n+t) - a(n)

where a(i) is the A037123 sequence from the Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences, which has several formulas. I think this will be quite fast:

a(n) = (1/2) * ( (n+1) * (n - 18 * sum{k>0, floor(n/10^k)} )
               + 9 * sum{k>0, (1+floor(n/10^k))*floor(n/10^k)*10^k}
               )
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This was the solution I was about to suggest. –  Gustav Bertram Sep 11 '12 at 7:04
    
Nice answer. And I believe finding the number of ending zeros can be done in O(loglogn) worst case, using binary search to find the first non-zero digit –  amit Sep 11 '12 at 7:27
    
Though linear search will also be O(loglogn) average case, I believe. –  amit Sep 11 '12 at 7:34
    
@amit: Can you check the last formula in my edit? –  ypercube Sep 11 '12 at 8:02
    
Thanks all for your responses.@ypercube,@Peter and @amit You Guys are really awesome! –  WebHrushi Sep 12 '12 at 7:40
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The fastest way would be to extract each digit and add it as you go.

public static void main(String... args) {
    // check values
    int runs = 1000000;
    for (int i = 100; i < runs; i++) {
        int sum = sumDigits(i - 1);
        int sum1 = sumDigits(i);
        int sum2 = sumDigits(sum, i);
        if (sum1 != sum2) throw new AssertionError(i + ": " + sum1 + " != " + sum2);
    }
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++) {
        int sum = sumDigits(i);
        // prevent optimising away.
        if (sum < 0) throw new AssertionError();
    }
    long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
    System.out.printf("sumDigits took an average of %,d ns%n", time / runs);
    long start2 = System.nanoTime();
    int lastSum = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++) {
        int sum = sumDigits(lastSum, i);
        lastSum = sum;
        // prevent optimising away.
        if (sum < 0) throw new AssertionError();
    }
    long time2 = System.nanoTime() - start2;
    System.out.printf("sumDigits using previous value took an average of %,d ns%n", time2 / runs);

    long large = Long.MAX_VALUE - runs - 1;

    long start3 = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++) {
        int sum = sumDigits(large + i);
        // prevent optimising away.
        if (sum < 0) throw new AssertionError();
    }
    long time3 = System.nanoTime() - start3;
    System.out.printf("sumDigits took an average of %,d ns%n", time3 / runs);
    long start4 = System.nanoTime();
    int lastSum2 = sumDigits(large);
    for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++) {
        int sum = sumDigits(lastSum2, large + i);
        lastSum2 = sum;
        // prevent optimising away.
        if (sum < 0) throw new AssertionError();
    }
    long time4 = System.nanoTime() - start4;
    System.out.printf("sumDigits using previous value took an average of %,d ns%n", time4 / runs);

}

public static int sumDigits(long n) {
    int sum = 0;
    do {
        sum += n % 10;
        n /= 10;
    } while (n > 0);
    return sum;
}

public static int sumDigits(int prevSum, long n) {
    while (n > 0 && n % 10 == 0) {
        prevSum -= 9;
        n /= 10;
    }
    return prevSum + 1;
}

prints

sumDigits took an average of 32 ns
sumDigits using previous value took an average of 10 ns
sumDigits took an average of 79 ns
sumDigits using previous value took an average of 7 ns

For large values, it can save around 70 ns. It add some complexity to your code. You have to use the first sumDigit to bootstrap the sum because you can't count all the way from 1 to 10^18.

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Good answer (+1 from me), but are you sure it is the fastest way? :-) –  Anders Gustafsson Sep 11 '12 at 7:19
    
Its not always the fastest way, but it is the most straight forward and most likely to work. When you get down to small methods like this, the only way to know for sure is to compare in a micro-benchmark and I suspect the difference isn't worth worrying about. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 11 '12 at 7:23
1  
@amit true and he is also trying to find the fastest solution. I suspect that trying to reuse the old value is more trouble than it is worth i.e. it won't be much faster but it will be much more complicated. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 11 '12 at 7:29
1  
@PeterLawrey:I am not sure. The solution suggested by ypercube scales much better (O(logn) vs O(loglogn)), and is pretty simple IMHO. I also believe the constants of his approach are pretty small. of course it does not matter if it does not happen for large numbers and/or tight loop - but I assume if it wasn't the case - the OP would have sticked to the naive solution (which he also suggested in the question) –  amit Sep 11 '12 at 7:32
1  
@amit very true. Actually the numbers I am trying to sum are large (up to 10^18) so the naive method does not stand a chance.Also I can read the first digit as a String hence I am planning to use more efficient int sum(String num) method (which could easily calculate the sum by reading once char at a time) to calculate the sum of digits of first number. –  WebHrushi Sep 11 '12 at 7:44
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Lets denote the sum of digits of a number n is s(n)

s(49) = 13

s(94) = 13

but 49+1 = 50 which s(50) = 5, while 94+1 = 95 which s(95) = 14. So if you were only given that the sum of digits of n is 13, you have at least two different possible answers for the sum of the digits of n+1. You need some additional information about n.

I do think a key is knowing that if n ends in a 9, s(n+1) will be at most s(n) - 9. (Ah, that's where ypercube's answer comes in.) So if you have xxxx9 (where the last x is anything but 9), s(xxxx9 + 1) = s(xxxx9) - 9 + 1. If you have xxx99, s(xxx99 + 1) = s(xxx99) - 18 + 1, etc.

So what might speed this up is if you count all the 10s, 100s, thousands, etc. in your range.

(Again, I see ypercube has beat me to the punch). It would appear that's what the formula for A037123 does exactly that (but from 0 to n). (Lets call that a(n))

So finally, since you're wanting the sum of the sum of digits from n to n+r, and not the sum from 1 to n, we need to see if we can derive a formula for sum of the sum of digits for a range ss(n,n+r)

That would appear to be simply

ss(n,n+r) = a(n+r) - a(n-1)

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