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db.tablebusiness.find({ "LongitudeLatitude" : { "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753], "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611 }, "Prominent" : { "$gte" : 15 }, "indexContents" : { "$all" : [/^soto/, /^nasi/] } }).limit(200);

db.tablebusiness.find({ "LongitudeLatitude" : { "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753], "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611 }, "Prominent" : { "$gte" : 15 }, "indexContents" : { "$in" : [/^soto/, /^nasi/] } }).limit(200);

This is result

/* 88 */
{
  "ts" : ISODate("2012-09-11T06:57:26.801Z"),
  "op" : "query",
  "ns" : "newisikota.tablebusiness",
  "query" : {
    "LongitudeLatitude" : {
      "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753],
      "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611
    },
    "Prominent" : {
      "$gte" : 15.0
    },
    "indexContents" : {
      "$all" : [/^soto/, /^nasi/]
    }
  },
  "ntoreturn" : 200,
  "nscanned" : 48,
  "nreturned" : 48,
  "responseLength" : 60002,
  "millis" : 3821,
  "client" : "127.0.0.1",
  "user" : ""
}

/* 89 */
{
  "ts" : ISODate("2012-09-11T06:57:43.147Z"),
  "op" : "query",
  "ns" : "newisikota.tablebusiness",
  "query" : {
    "LongitudeLatitude" : {
      "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753],
      "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611
    },
    "Prominent" : {
      "$gte" : 15.0
    },
    "indexContents" : {
      "$in" : [/^soto/, /^nasi/]
    }
  },
  "ntoreturn" : 200,
  "nscanned" : 200,
  "nreturned" : 200,
  "responseLength" : 249598,
  "millis" : 320,
  "client" : "127.0.0.1",
  "user" : ""
}

Note: the $all query can run for 26 seconds once in a while.

The explain result is the following:

db.tablebusiness.find({ "LongitudeLatitude" : { "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753], "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611 }, "Prominent" : { "$gte" : 15 }, "indexContents" : { "$all" : [/^soto/, /^nasi/] } }).limit(200).explain();




{
        "cursor" : "GeoSearchCursor",
        "nscanned" : 48,
        **"nscannedObjects" : 48,**
        "n" : 48,
        "millis" : 8563,
        "nYields" : 0,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "isMultiKey" : false,
        "indexOnly" : false,
        "indexBounds" : {
        }
}
>


db.tablebusiness.find({ "LongitudeLatitude" : { "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753], "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611 }, "Prominent" : { "$gte" : 15 }, "indexContents" : { "$in" : [/^soto/, /^nasi/] } }).limit(200).explain();
{
        "cursor" : "GeoSearchCursor",
        "nscanned" : 200,
        **"nscannedObjects" : 200,**
        "n" : 200,
        "millis" : 516,
        "nYields" : 0,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "isMultiKey" : false,
        "indexOnly" : false,
        "indexBounds" : {
        }
}

Notice that the $in search scan more object.

Worst come to worst, mongdob could do $in search and then filter things out. The ratio shouldn't be huge.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe $in is using an index and $all isn't. Could you run the queries with .explain() to find out? –  Philipp Sep 11 '12 at 7:55
    
From explain it looks like both are using the same index. –  gkamal Sep 11 '12 at 9:43
    
Actually that's the other issue. Why I cannot see the name of the index used? Do I use the wrong version of mongodb? I thought I downloaded the latest. –  Jim Thio Sep 11 '12 at 12:47

2 Answers 2

You are comparing apples with oranges. Both queries return different results. $all means that the field value should match all the inputs whereas $in means that the field value should match any one of the values. $all is and, $in is or.

Combined with the $limit - the $all query will need to look at more documents to find the match as compared to in.

share|improve this answer
    
Because indexContents is an array –  Jim Thio Sep 11 '12 at 9:05
    
I am well aware of the difference between $all and $in, and if the difference between the time is not so huge I can understand. Even combined at the limit, both need to find the closest documents. Also notice the explain shows that $in actually scan more document. –  Jim Thio Sep 11 '12 at 9:10
    
Yes there will be more points matching $in than $all and that actually shows that $in should be slower than $all. Your reasoning is invalid. Even though $in find more points to meet the quota of 100 it can't just rest. –  Jim Thio Sep 11 '12 at 9:13
    
when you use limit it will stop once it finds the required number of documents (unless you have sort). I can't explain the less number of documents scanned. Is this results repeatable, there can be concurrent activities that might cause the difference - waiting on lock for e.g.,? Can you run the queries multiple times and note down the timings? Can you run them in the other order - $in first and $all second? –  gkamal Sep 11 '12 at 9:41
    
This is consistent with most 2 keywords. $in always outperform $all. Also, speaking of sorting, $nearSphere sort by distance right? –  Jim Thio Sep 11 '12 at 12:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I asked a similar question in Why using $all in mongodb is much slower?

This time I use only one word. Hence, there should be no difference between $in and $all. They both are equivalent.

Still $all is much slower.

Turns out, per answer on that, there is a bug in mongodb itself.

https://jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-1748

I guess I simply won't use $all at all until the problem is fixed.

To all other answers, have you tried this your self?

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