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What i want to know is how can you give input to a GUI app that is closed source and does not have any public API.

To be more concise, let's say you open solitaire and want through a program to play it. Or, to go even to the basics, you have an GUI app with a button and you want to click it through another program.

I know the question is a little vague, but that's the best I can phrase it. Please help me with some edits or some comments to make it more specific.

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Investigate SendInput(). It can be used to simulate mouse movements and key presses. –  hmjd Sep 11 '12 at 8:08
    
@hmjd Thanks. That was what I was looking for. Please post the answer to accept your answer. If you have knowledge about how to do it in Linux as well, please include it in your answer. Also, how to get focus on a particular GUI app (useful when some keystrokes have effect only when the app is in focus) would be helpful. –  coredump Sep 11 '12 at 8:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Investigate SendInput(). It can be used to simulate mouse movements and key presses.

To locate a Windows application using its GUI you can use EnumWindows() to locate a Window with a particular title. This will provide a Window handle. To give that window focus, you could:

  • obtain the window handle via EnumWindows()
  • use GetWindowRect() to get the co-ordinates of the window rectangle
  • move the mouse to within the bounds of the window using SendInput() and simulate a mouse click using SendInput()

I have done this once, and it is infuriatingly difficult to get right. Once you start your program sit on your hands: don't touch the mouse or the keyboard.

(I have no knowledge on how to do anything like this on Linux)

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Assuming its an X11 app in Linux you could connect the process to one end of a named pipe and then echo X-Input events down the other end of the pipe.

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