Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
// same X, Y value text.
    TextInfo currXY = new TextInfo( text );

    ArrayList<TextPosition> currTextArray = textComposition.get( currXY );
    if( currTextArray != null ){
        currTextArray.add( text ); 
    } else {
        ArrayList<TextPosition> newTextArray = new ArrayList<TextPosition>();
        newTextArray.add( text );
        if( textComposition.containsKey( currXY )){
            System.out.println( "processTextPosition : containsKEy ");
        }
        textComposition.put( currXY , newTextArray );
    }   

A HashMap can't have duplicate or same key, right?

I get all entry from hashmap and put these entries into a new hashmap.

It proceed like same key.

lineSortingMap = new HashMap< TextInfo, ArrayList<TextPosition> > ();     
    for ( Map.Entry< TextInfo, ArrayList<TextPosition> > entry : textComposition.entrySet() ) {
        TextInfo key = (TextInfo)entry.getKey();
        ArrayList<TextPosition> arrayTextPositions = entry.getValue();
        if( lineSortingMap.containsKey( key ) ){
            System.out.println("WTFcontainsKey : " + " " + key + " " + key.getX() + " " + key.getY() );
        }
        else{
            lineSortingMap.put( key , arrayTextPositions );
        }
    }

result:

WTFcontainsKey :  analyzeSrc.TextInfo@4c5 75.307 603.85535

WTFcontainsKey :  analyzeSrc.TextInfo@4c5 71.74238 603.85535

WTFcontainsKey :  analyzeSrc.TextInfo@4c4 66.36187 612.82837

...

Can you explain what happens here?

Why doesn't it print "processTextPosition : containsKey"?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Probably because your Key Object doesn't override equals() and hashCode() correctly.

See the docs of Object.hashCode() and the Section Object as a Superclass from the Java Tutorial

Or even better: Read Effective Java (2nd Ed) by Joshua Bloch

share|improve this answer
1  
@JoachimSauer the amazing thing is how little this is stressed in the official Sun / Oracle documentation. Both the Maps section of the Java tutorial and the HashMap JavaDocs hardly mention the importance of a consistent equals() / hashCode() implementation. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 11 '12 at 8:31
    
I've got the impression that much of the API documentation is written from a view influenced by formal systems ("What do you mean? The requirements for equals()/hashCode() are clearly documented, if you don't follow them the system is FUBAR, isn't that obvious?") as opposed to a real-world documentation ("Note, as documented in this and this location, you must make sure that ..."). –  Joachim Sauer Sep 11 '12 at 9:11
    
thank you for your answer :) I do override equals() and hashCode(). but I can't understand that when first call containsKey method, it return false... next I move entries of that hashmap, but this time containsKey method return true –  Hanbum Bak Sep 11 '12 at 10:46
    
@HanbumBak as others have suggested, post the code of your equals() and hashCode() methods and we can see what's wrong in them. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 11 '12 at 13:16
    
I solve this problem. :) when I move entries from original HashMap to lineSortingMap, I use entry object. like this : TextInfo key = entry.getKey(); containsKey use getEntry method and this method use object's equals method. TextInfo is my custom class, but call String class's equals method. that is problem. I can't understand why but I'll fix it. thanks you :D –  Hanbum Bak Sep 12 '12 at 5:19
add comment

It's hard to know without seeing the full code, but I'm reasonably sure that your TextInfo class does not correctly implement equals() and hashCode(). Having those two methods implemented is a prerequisite to being useful as a key in a HashMap.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your answer :) I do override equals() and hashCode(). but I can't understand that when first call containsKey method, it return false... next I move entries of that hashmap, but this time containsKey method return true... –  Hanbum Bak Sep 11 '12 at 10:15
1  
@HanbumBak: and how did you implement it? Show us the code, as that's the most likely source of this problem. –  Joachim Sauer Sep 11 '12 at 10:16
    
I solve this problem. :) –  Hanbum Bak Sep 12 '12 at 5:13
add comment

For using a object which you have created as a key in Map you should overwrite hashCode() and equals() methods. I am pretty sure that your class TextInfo doesn't provide the implementation for the same.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.