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I'm writing a program that's working with external data, which I can't control. This data changes over time, but I want my program to be compatible to various versions of it. In other languages I'd use #define to specify the version, and than use #if, to do the necessary things for the specified version. Like

#if VERSION >= 5
    ...
#endif

I know this isn't possible in C#, since it only allows to define symbols, but not assign something to them. So I'm wondering, what's the best way to accomplish this? I could define things like VERSION_5, but I'd rather be able to check specific versions, and especially ranges, which would be annoying like this. The next best thing I can think of is const, but that would have to be checked on run-time, which might slow down things a tiny little bit. I'm not sure if it would even be noticeable in my project, but I'm worried about it.

Is there a standard way to do this in C#? What's the best way?

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2  
a versioned contract.... – Mitch Wheat Sep 11 '12 at 8:09
2  
Why using the preprocessor at all? Can't you make such decisions at runtime, using ordinary if (version >= 5) conditional statements? – Christian.K Sep 11 '12 at 8:10
    
Like I said, I'm a bit worried it might have an impact on the performance at some point. It's a server application, and almost every incoming message's structure will be dependent on the version. – Mars Sep 11 '12 at 8:16
    
No need to worry about that. Furthermore, I don't really understand how it would even work with preprocessor directive as you need to specify the VERSION symbol at compile time but the messages will reach you only at runtime... – Daniel Hilgarth Sep 11 '12 at 8:21
    
The messages have a different structure, depending on the version. I'd compile the program for, let's say, version 5, and once it runs, only messages from that version will be correctly interpreted. Not the ideal solution, but that's what I'm used to^^ But if you say it's nothing to worry about, I might reconsider const, or even read the client's version. – Mars Sep 11 '12 at 8:32

I would create one or multiple interfaces for the data processing. Each interface gets potentially implemented multiple times, once per version range. These interface implementations than get injected into the class that handles the data.

Something like this:

public interface IDataProcessor
{
    void Process(Data data);
    bool SupportsVersion(int version);
}

In the data handler class:

foreach(var dataProcessor in _dataProcessors)
{
    if(dataProcessor.SupportsVersion(versionOfCurrentData))
    {
        dataProcessor.Process(data);
    }
}
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1  
I'd take an similar approach using an factory-pattern. – TGlatzer Sep 11 '12 at 8:17

This example is .NET version dependent. For some projects, they use

#if NET_2_0
...
#endif
#if NET_3_5
...
#endif
#if NET_4_0
...
#endif
#if NET_4_5
...
#endif

At the end of the lifecycle for .NET 1.1, they simply remove NET_2_0 conditionals in order to maintain less conditionals.

In project file for .NET 4.5, define NET_2_0, NET_3_5, NET_4_0, NET_4_5

In project file for .NET 4.0, define NET_2_0, NET_3_5, NET_4_0

In project file for .NET 3.5, define NET_2_0, NET_3_5

In project file for .NET 2.0, define NET_2_0

In project file for .NET 1.1, no define symbol

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I'm writing a program that's working with external data, which I can't control.

So while it's a server application, you may recieve data formatted with any version, then, you have to support all. In result, you should not make compile time decisions via directives, you should analyze data runtime for a supported pattern and continue the suitable processing after recognizing the pattern. For example run different threads for different versions then recognizer should pass the recognized data to responsible suitable threads in parallel and also fail unknown data!

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