Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my DSL I want this functionality:

class Test {

  val compA = dependant(true, true)(Component("parameters"))

  //and this shortcut:

  val compB = dependant Component("parameters")
}

where:

def dependant(onEnable: Boolean, onDisable: Boolean)(c: Component): Component = {
   //...
}

def dependant(c: Component): Component = dependant(false, true)(c)

all is fine, however, I cannot use this syntax:

val compB = dependant Component("parameters")

because it says

ambiguous reference to overloaded definition, both method dependant in class Test of type (onEnable: Boolean, onDisable: Boolean)(c: Component)Component and method dependant in class Test of type (c: Component)Component match expected type ?

But if I enclose the parameter in parenthesis:

val compB = dependant(Component("parameters"))

the error is gone. Obviously, the compiler fails in desugarating the parenthesisless case. Is this expected or am I doing something wrong? If this is expected, then Why? How can I reclaim the ability to use the method dependant as a prefix, without parenthesis?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In dependant Component("parameters") you are trying to use a prefix notation to call the dependant. Scala's support for prefix notation is limited.

See Scala - Prefix Unary Operators.

An alternative is to use a postfix notation (as in Component("parameters") dependant). If you can modify the implementaiton of Componenet, this simply means adding the dependant methods to Component:

class Component(name: String) {
  def dependant: Component = //...
  def dependant(onEnable: Boolean, onDisable: Boolean): Component = {
    //...
  }    
}

class Test {
  val compA = Component("parameters") dependant(true, true)
  val compB = Component("parameters") dependant
}

If you can't modify Component, you can use the "pimp my library idiom". See http://www.decodified.com/scala/2010/12/02/the-quickpimp-pattern.html for a short introduction to this idiom (along with a warning on using an anonymous class as below):

case class Component(name: String)

implicit def toPostifxDependentOps( c: Component ) = new {
  def dependant: Component = dependant(false, true)
  def dependant(onEnable: Boolean, onDisable: Boolean): Component = {
    //...
  }
}

class Test {
  val compA = Component("parameters") dependant(true, true)
  val compB = Component("parameters") dependant
}
share|improve this answer

Writing myObject functionName paraminstead of myObject.functionName(param) works as expected if you propvide an object. If you don't, the compiler will be lost. For example:

scala> println("Hello")
Hello

scala> println "Hello"
<console>:1: error: ';' expected but string literal found.
       println "Hello"
           ^

A possible workaround: create an object to wrap your method:

scala> case class Component(name: String, components: Option[Component] = None)
defined class Component

scala> object depends {def on(c: Component) = Component("dependant", Some(c))}
defined module depends

scala> depends on Component("foo")
res3: Component = Component(dependant,Some(Component(foo,None)))
share|improve this answer
    
A nice solution - might become handy when I have much to implement in the helper object, like not only on! However, in this situation, I need exactly dependant, not depends on, it has a different symantic meaning in my program - the dependant denotes that the member depends on the aggregating instance. –  noncom Sep 13 '12 at 16:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.