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Using CSS3, HTML (and javascript/jquery if needed), I need to rotate an image 90/270 degrees and have it position to fill its parent div/container. Sounds simple, but when images are rotated, there positioning changes and I can't figure out how or why.

Here is a jsFiddle to explain - http://jsfiddle.net/UPGkU/2/ - I just want the blue logo to be position exactly within the red div.

Of course, I could use specific offsets, but if a different image is used, those offsets change, so I really want to find a generic solution.

Any help would be fantastic, thanks!

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i think you want this jsfiddle.net/UPGkU/5 –  Rohit Azad Sep 11 '12 at 9:21

3 Answers 3

You need to set a transform-origin - in this scenario, a point around which the image gets rotated.

#image {
  -webkit-transform: rotate(90deg);
  -webkit-transform-origin: 0 0; //initially 50% 50%
  margin-left: 100%;
}

90deg fiddle / 270deg fiddle

Update:

The challenge with the latter is that we can't really modify transform-origin as its position is relative to the not yet transformed element and we can't just set margin-top:100% since margin values (even vertical ones) are calculated as a percentage always relative to the width of the containing block. The following code should work:

#image {
  -webkit-transform: rotate(-90deg);
  -webkit-transform-origin: 0 0;
  position:relative;
  top:100%;
}
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1  
I prefer your solution : +1. It is not image-size dependent –  Fabrizio Calderan Sep 11 '12 at 9:24
1  
+1. Perhaps it's also worth mentioning that the initial value for transform-origin is 50% 50%. –  Ana Sep 11 '12 at 10:41
    
thank you so much! that is exactly what I needed! –  Tom Carnell Sep 11 '12 at 10:52
    
ah, but if I rotate it 270 degrees the solution break. Is there a way that it can fit inside the red container if rotated 90 or 270 degrees? If the answer is 'no', that is fine! –  Tom Carnell Sep 11 '12 at 11:07
    
@TomCarnell: check the update –  o.v. Sep 11 '12 at 23:52

try with

#image {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(90deg);
    -webkit-transform-origin: 0 100%;
    position : relative;
    top      : -50px;
}

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+1, if only this could be made more generic (i.e. without relying on dimensions in pixels) –  o.v. Sep 11 '12 at 9:24

Hi now used to this css used position

#wrapper {
    width:50px;
    height:150px;
    border:2px solid red;
    position:relative;
}
#image {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(90deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(90deg);
    position:absolute;
    left:-49px;
    top:50px;
}

Demo

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