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Is there a way to make MySQL tell which subquery gave the above error in a huge autogenerated query full of subqueries? If not, what would be your strategy for debugging it?

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2  
divide and conquer: comment out half of the subqueries from the huge one and run. See if there is an error. if no error, remove comments and comment out the other half. if the error remains, then remove the comments from half of the subquieries –  bpgergo Sep 11 '12 at 9:25
    
@bpgergo: that seems very fragile to me. Replacing a subquery with a constant value (I take it that's what you mean by commenting out) might result in some join not matching and parts of the non-commented-out half being optimized out; or the problematic subquery might be correlated on a value which is changed by commenting out. So even if the error disappears after commenting something out, I can't really be sure where the error was. –  Tgr Sep 11 '12 at 9:42
    
yeah, you're right about subqueries in the WHERE clause. For some reason I supposed the subqueries are in the FROM clause. –  bpgergo Sep 11 '12 at 10:09

2 Answers 2

I would start by using either LIMIT or DISTINCT on the query and possibly sub queries. If that didn't work I'd start going through and running each sub query individually, yes it's time consuming but I find it also helps to avoid the same problem in the future.

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Example query:

UPDATE direct_orders do
SET do.dealer_id = (
    SELECT d.dealer_id FROM dealers d
    INNER JOIN dealer_addresses da 
        ON da.dealer_id = d.dealer_id
        AND da.type =  'M'
        AND da.status = 1
    INNER JOIN dealer_details dd 
        ON dd.dealer_id = d.dealer_id
        AND dd.status = 1
    WHERE ( da.address1 LIKE CONCAT(  '%', do.address1,  '%' ) AND do.postal LIKE da.postal_code ) 
    OR dd.name LIKE CONCAT(  '%', do.company,  '%' ) 
    AND do.dealer_id = 0
)

This query was failing, for the same reason as the poster. One way of testing this properly is to do something like the following (note the LEFT JOIN of the table that was previously relied upon for sub-correlation):

SELECT d.dealer_id FROM dealers d 
LEFT JOIN direct_orders do
    ON do.dealer_id = 0
INNER JOIN dealer_addresses da 
    ON da.dealer_id = d.dealer_id
    AND da.type =  'M'
    AND da.status = 1
INNER JOIN dealer_details dd 
    ON dd.dealer_id = d.dealer_id
    AND dd.status = 1
WHERE (da.address1 LIKE CONCAT(  '%', do.address1,  '%' ) AND do.postal LIKE da.postal_code ) 
OR dd.name LIKE CONCAT(  '%', do.company,  '%' )        

Doing this revealed that there was in fact one record from the "direct_orders" table that return more than one "dealer_id" from the "dealers" table.

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