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This is just a curiosity question that I didn't know how to search via google.

Some functions are like this:

function foo()
{
    $bar = 'Hello World';

    return;
}

What is retun; going to return? This is kinda ridiculous.

share|improve this question
    
there the function will stop – Matei Mihai Sep 11 '12 at 10:07
2  
@Breezer no, it returns null instead. – Raptor Sep 11 '12 at 10:07
1  
Could var_dump(foo()) answer to your question ? – Touki Sep 11 '12 at 10:08
    
@ShivanRaptor yeah my mistake – Breezer Sep 11 '12 at 10:09
1  
A question like this should be answered with a link to the PHP manual, with a RTFM tag. – dbf Sep 11 '12 at 10:27
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It does return null. If return is called without any variable or value return will return null.

A note from PHP manual page

If no parameter is supplied, then the parentheses must be omitted and NULL will be returned. Calling return() with parentheses but with no arguments will result in a parse error.

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Note: If no parameter is supplied, then the parentheses must be omitted and NULL will be returned. Calling return with parentheses but with no arguments will result in a parse error.

http://www.php.net/return

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if you are using

function foo()
{
    $bar = 'Hello World';

    return;
}
echo $temp=foo();

than it return NULL value

and if you are using

function foo()
{
    $bar = 'Hello World';

    return $bar;
}

    echo $temp=foo();

than it returns Hello World.

share|improve this answer

You could have figured that out very easy:

function foo()
{
    $bar = 'Hello World';

    return;
}

var_dump( foo() );
share|improve this answer

return will simply return control to who called that function, returning a NULL value. So, if you have this snippet of code

function bar()
{
  echo 'bar';
  $a = foo();
  echo 'foobar';
}

First it prints 'bar' string, then control is passed to foo() function who assign to (local) $bar variable 'Hello World' string value. Then this variable is destroyed (you exit from function) and control returns to bar() function. After that a 'foobar' string is displayed.
Note that a will have a NULL value

share|improve this answer
    
Don't know who downvote and, as always, no one leave a comment..... – DonCallisto Sep 11 '12 at 10:16
    
i didnt vote down but you miss to give $ sign to variable a. – Harshal Mahajan Sep 11 '12 at 10:22
    
@HarshalMahajan fixed, but I don't think that a '$' missed is a good reason for downvoting (know that you haven't downvoted but .... ) – DonCallisto Sep 11 '12 at 10:23
    
now rest are fine and it gives "barfoobar" output. – Harshal Mahajan Sep 11 '12 at 10:25

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