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PDF file has structure like this (more or less, just to picture my needs)

%Header containing PDF version and two characters that ensure PDF is read properly
//objects
//cross-reference table

However, if I add text formed like this %text between last two elements of the list above, PDF should not get courrupted, and the line would be ignored with PDF readers, right? As far as I know, "%" in PDF is same as "//" in Java.

I want to add some of my custom data to PDF this way. It may not be the best way to do it, but it's the simplest way for me. Later I may change it, but for now I'd like to stick with it.

The question is, for one, is my assumption that if the lines are added to the correct spot of PDF, PDF itself won't be corrupted, and secondly, I'd like to know which classes and methods should I use to achieve this.

I start with regular PDF, and I want to end up with PDF enriched with my data.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

if I add text formed like this %text between last two elements of the list above, PDF should not get corrupted, and the line would be ignored with PDF readers, right?

Wrong!

First, your given PDF file structure is incomplete (even to "picture your needs"). It misses the startxref element.

The correct (rough) structure of PDF files (for your needs) requires to consider these four elements:

  1. PDF header
  2. PDF body (objects)
  3. PDF xref table
  4. PDF trailer

The cross-reference table is a sort of TOC (table of contents) listing all objects in the PDF file. These objects are located through this TOC listing with their file byte offset value, calculated from the start of the file.

So if you insert anything into a PDF (even a comment that should otherwise be ignored by PDF readers), you have to adapt the byte offset values in the Xref table for all objects that come after your inserted comment.

Then, the trailer comes next in importance: it contains an entry called startxref which holds the file byte offset value for the (last) xref section. (Last xref section because PDF files may have not just one, but multiple xref sections.)

Therefore, conforming PDF readers should start reading the PDF file from the end. There they find the location of the xref table. Then, by reading the xref table they'll find each object.

In your special case (you want to insert a comment after all the PDF objects, but before the Xref table), you also need to adapt the number given by the startxref keyword: if your comment is 55 characters long (including newline characters) then add 55 to the previous value and you should be fine.

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