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What I'm trying to do is emulate boolean logic that could be found on a computer in C++ code. Right now I'm trying to create a 32 bit adder. When I run the testing code, I get an output of 32, which is wrong it should be 64. I'm fairly sure that my add function is correct. The code for those gates is:

bool and(bool a, bool b)
{
return nand(nand(a,b),nand(a,b));
}

bool or(bool a, bool b)
{
return nand(nand(a,a),nand(b,b));
}

bool nor(bool a, bool b)
{
return nand(nand(nand(a,a), nand(b,b)),nand(nand(a,a), nand(b,b)));
}

The code for the add function:

bool *add(bool a, bool b, bool carry)
{
static bool out[2];

out[0] = nor(nor(a, b), carry);
out[1] = or(and(b,carry),and(a,b));

return out;
}

bool *add32(bool a[32], bool b[32], bool carry)
{
static bool out[33];
bool *tout;

for(int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
{
    tout = add(a[i], b[i], (i==0)?false:tout[1]);
    out[i] = tout[0];
}
out[32] = tout[1];

return out;
}

The code I'm using to test this is:

bool *a = int32tobinary(32);
bool *b = int32tobinary(32);
bool *c = add32(a, b, false);
__int32 i = binarytoint32(c);

Those two functions are:

bool *int32tobinary(__int32 a)
{
static bool _out[32];
bool *out = _out;
int i;

for(i = 31; i >= 0; i--)
{
    out[i] = (a&1) ? true : false;
    a >>= 1;
}

return out;
}

__int32 binarytoint32(bool b[32])
{
int result = 0;
int i;

for(i = 0; i < 32; i++)
{
    if(b[i] == true)
        result += (int)pow(2.0f, 32 - i - 1);
}

return result;
}
share|improve this question
1  
What have you tried? something like step by step / printf debugging to see at what point it deviates from what you expect maybe? –  PlasmaHH Sep 11 '12 at 10:36
2  
Sounds like a job for a debugger. In any case, returning a pointer to a static variable is usually a bad idea. –  interjay Sep 11 '12 at 10:36
3  
or and and are reserved words in C++, you cannot use them as identifiers. A decent compiler would complain about this. I’m inferring that you’re probably using MSVC or an old compiler. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 11 '12 at 10:39
    
I think add32 needs to add from right to left, i.e. i should start at the LS bit, which seems to be bit 31 in your code ? –  Paul R Sep 11 '12 at 10:57

1 Answer 1

Where to start?

As noted in the comments, returning a pointer to a static variable is wrong.

This

out[0] = nor(nor(a, b), carry); 

should be

out[0] = xor(xor(a, b), carry);

This out[1] = or(and(b,carry),and(a,b)); is also incorrect. out[1] must be true, when a == true and carry == true.

add32 assumes index 0 to be the LSB, int32tobinary and int32tobinary assume index 0 to be MSB.

share|improve this answer
    
Also the carry out bit is at the wrong end of tout, I think ? –  Paul R Sep 11 '12 at 10:59
    
In add I changed the out[1] = line to be: out[1] = or(and(xor(a,b),carry),and(a,b)); which I think is right according to the diagram here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adder_(electronics) "full adder logic diagram" –  Tom Tetlaw Sep 11 '12 at 11:23

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