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I am getting the below error while using map and performing some remove.How to avoid this ?

Caused by: java.util.ConcurrentModificationException
    at java.util.HashMap$HashIterator.nextEntry(HashMap.java:793)
    at java.util.HashMap$EntryIterator.next(HashMap.java:834)
    at java.util.HashMap$EntryIterator.next(HashMap.java:832)


   Map<FormField, Object> ItemMap = domainItem.getValues();         
   for (Map.Entry<FormField, Object> ValMap : ItemMap.entrySet()) {         
       List<Field> groupIdList = Mapper.getGroupId(groupFieldId);           
       for (Field field : groupIdList) {
           ItemMap.put(new FormField(field), domainItem.getDomainItemLinkId());
       }
       ItemMap.remove(ValMap.getKey());
   }
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Update:

Use Iterator and ConcurrentHashMap to avoid this scenario

Following won't throw exception

    Map<Integer, String> map = new ConcurrentHashMap<Integer, String>();
    map.put(1, "a");
    map.put(2, "b");
    map.put(3, "c");
    map.put(4, "d");
    for (Iterator<Integer> keys = map.keySet().iterator(); keys.hasNext();) {
        Integer key = keys.next();
        String val = map.get(key);
        map.remove(key);
    }

or use another map while iterating and at the end copy it to source

for example:

    Map<Integer, String> dummy = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
    map.put(1, "a");
    map.put(2, "b");
    map.put(3, "c");
    map.put(4, "d");
    dummy.putAll(map);
    for (Iterator<Integer> keys = dummy.keySet().iterator(); keys.hasNext();) {
        Integer key = keys.next();
        String val = map.get(key);
        map.remove(key);
    }
    System.out.println(map);
share|improve this answer
    
how to avoid this i need to add the data also. – pars Sep 11 '12 at 10:50
    
Can you please edit the above snippet and show me – pars Sep 11 '12 at 10:52
    
,please explain how can i use a iterator in my above snippet – pars Sep 11 '12 at 11:04
    
Updated answer, – Jigar Joshi Sep 11 '12 at 11:13
    
can also show the another map nd copy snippet example because in my case map is already available to me – pars Sep 11 '12 at 11:23

A Map is sorted by the keys in the key-value pairs. When you add or remove elements from the Map while you are iterating through them, the program essentially loses track of "where" in the Map it is.

To get around this, try making a separate, temporary transfer Map. There is also a class called Iterator which might suit your needs.

share|improve this answer
    
,please explain how can i use a iterator in my above snippet – pars Sep 11 '12 at 11:04
    
Jigar Joshi explains it with code samples in an answer above. =) – asteri Sep 11 '12 at 12:50

One way to avoid this issue is to iterate over a copy.

for (Map.Entry<FormField, Object> ValMap : 
     new HashMap<FormField, Object>(ItemMap).entrySet()) {
share|improve this answer
    
if i create a copy then i can use for (Field field : groupIdList) { ItemMap.put(new FormField(field), domainItem.getDomainItemLinkId()); } ItemMap.remove(ValMap.getKey()); – pars Sep 11 '12 at 10:57
    
Its not possible to say from the code you have given as your interaction is very complicated. I would move this code into the class of domainItem so you can see all the dependencies. – Peter Lawrey Sep 11 '12 at 11:01
    
Map<FormField, Object> ItemMap = domainItem.getValues(); for (Map.Entry<FormField, Object> ValMap : new HashMap<FormField, Object>(ItemMap).entrySet()) { List<Field> groupIdList = Mapper.getGroupId(groupFieldId); for (Field field : groupIdList) { ItemMap.put(new FormField(field), domainItem.getDomainItemLinkId()); } ItemMap.remove(ValMap.getKey()); } – pars Sep 11 '12 at 11:03
    
please see the above code,is this fine? – pars Sep 11 '12 at 11:03
    
You need to include the code for all the methods called in case there are side effects, which is why suggest you put all the code in one place. The reason I am concerned is that half the loop doesn't appear to need to be there so there must be something going on which I cannot see. ;) – Peter Lawrey Sep 11 '12 at 11:04

can be done without a copy of the map, execute this example and take a look at the code:

public static void main(String[] args)
  {

    System.out.println("creating map ...");

    Map<String, String> dummyMap = new HashMap<>();
    while (dummyMap.size() < 10)
    { dummyMap.put(String.valueOf(new Random().nextInt()), String.valueOf(new Random().nextInt())); }


    System.out.println("start, map size: " + dummyMap.size() + ", keys=" + dummyMap.keySet());


    System.out.print("going to remove: ");
    for (Iterator<String> keys = dummyMap.keySet().iterator(); keys.hasNext(); )
    {
      final String key = keys.next();

      // delete map entries per random
      if(new Random().nextInt(3)>1)
      {
        System.out.print(key+" ");
        keys.remove();
      }
    }
    System.out.print("\n");

    System.out.println("done, map size: " + dummyMap.size() + ", keys=" + dummyMap.keySet());
  }

and take a look at this similar question.

HTH,

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